ChoctawEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • ʋm (traditional)

PrefixEdit

am- (after another prefix -sam-, before consonants a-, class III first-person singular)

  1. the indirect object of an active transitive verb
    to me, for me
  2. the subject of an intransitive affective verb
    I
  3. the direct object of a small set of transitive verbs mostly dealing with affect, communication and intimacy
    me
  4. indicates possession of a noun
    my

InflectionEdit


Classical NahuatlEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • an- (when followed by a consonant which is not labial)

PrefixEdit

am-

  1. Subject prefix for verbs; it indicates that the subject is second-person plural; you, you all.

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *am-, allophonic variant of *an- before *b and .

PronunciationEdit

With lenited m:

With unlenited m:

PrefixEdit

am-

  1. Alternative form of an- (un-, not)

Usage notesEdit

The lenited form is used before r, l, and n as well as a few vowel-initial forms that started with *ɸ in Proto-Celtic. The unlenited form is used before b and p.[1]

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Thurneysen, Rudolf (1940, reprinted 2003)D. A. Binchy and Osborn Bergin, transl., A Grammar of Old Irish, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, →ISBN, § 871, page 543

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From am (about).

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

am-

  1. around, circum-
    am- + ‎llen (sheet) → ‎amlen (envelope)
    am- + ‎ysgrifio (to write, to inscribe) → ‎amsgrifio (to circumscribe)
    am- + ‎cau (to close) → ‎amgáu (to enclose)

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
am- unchanged unchanged ham-
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “am-”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies