See also: Punt and pùnt

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old English [Term?], from Latin pontō (Gaulish flat-bottomed boat, pontoon), from pons (bridge); readopted from Middle Low German punte (ferry boat) or Middle Dutch ponte (ferry boat) of the same origin.

 
A traditional upper-Thames punt in use for placing eel-traps called grig-weels in the 19th century

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /pʌnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Noun edit

punt (plural punts)

  1. (nautical) A pontoon; a narrow shallow boat propelled by a pole.
Translations edit

Verb edit

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. (nautical) To propel a punt or similar craft by means of a pole.
  2. Of a fish, to walk along the seafloor using its fins as limbs.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Possibly a dialectal variant of bunt. Rugby is the origin of the sports usage of the term.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. To dropkick; to kick something a considerable distance.
    • 1975, Barry Targan, Harry Belten and the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, page 133:
      At the dump he emptied the station wagon quickly and only once punted a bag of refuse, exploding it like a pinata at a Mexican Christmas.
    • 2019, Maurice Carlos Ruffin, We Cast a Shadow, One World, →ISBN, page 100:
      He even hated pets—I once saw him punt a cat.
    1. (rugby, American football, Australian Rules football, Gaelic football, soccer, transitive, intransitive) To kick a ball dropped from the hands before it hits the ground. (This puts the ball farther from the goal across which the opposing team is attempting to score, so improves the chances of the team punting.)
    2. (soccer) To kick a bouncing ball far and high.
      • 2011 September 2, “Wales 2-1 Montenegro”, in BBC[1]:
        With five minutes remaining Hennessey was down well to block another Vukcevic shot, while Gunter was smartly in to punt away the dangerous loose ball.
  2. (colloquial, intransitive) To equivocate and delay or put off (answering a question, addressing an issue, etc).
    • 2014, John Prados, The Family Jewels: The CIA, Secrecy, and Presidential Power, University of Texas Press, →ISBN, page 91:
      The briefer reported it had been terminated on orders from Secretary Schlesinger, but attributed this to a sense Shamrock produced little, not to the fact it had been discovered. The NSA briefer punted on whether Fort Meade had been reading Americans' private messages, ...
  3. To retreat from one's objective; to abandon an effort one still notionally supports.
    • ca. 2002, Ben Collins-Sussman, Brian W. Fitzpatrick, C. Michael Pilato, “Basic Work Cycle”, in Version Control with Subversion[2]:
      Punting: Using svn revert¶ If you decide that you want to throw out your changes and start your edits again (whether this occurs after a conflict or anytime), just revert your changes
  4. (colloquial, intransitive) To make the best choice from a set of non-ideal alternatives.
  5. (colloquial, transitive) To eject; to kick out of a place.
    • 2001, Roger A. Grimes, Malicious Mobile Code: Virus Protection for Windows, page 236:
      The user is punted from the channel, and must rejoin to gain access.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Noun edit

punt (plural punts)

  1. (rugby, American football, soccer) A kick made by a player who drops the ball and kicks it before it hits the ground.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
 
Empty bottle showing the punt as the indentation in the base
See also edit

Etymology 3 edit

Borrowed from French pointe or Spanish punto (point). Doublet of point.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt (plural punts)

  1. A point in the game of faro.
  2. The act of playing at basset, baccara, faro, etc.
  3. A bet or wager.
    Anyone up for a punt on Randwick?
  4. (Australia) Gambling, as a pastime, especially betting on horseraces or the dogs.
    • 2001 December 31, The Riverine Herald, Echua, Victoria, page 12, column 3:
      Wishing you all happy new year and a prosperous one on the punt.
  5. A highly speculative investment or other commitment.
  6. A wild guess.
  7. An indentation in the base of a wine bottle.
  8. (glassblowing) A thin glass rod which is temporarily attached to a larger piece in order to better manipulate the larger piece.
Translations edit

Verb edit

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. To play at basset, baccara, faro, etc.
    • 1848 November – 1850 December, William Makepeace Thackeray, chapter 38, in The History of Pendennis. [], volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], published 1849–1850, →OCLC:
      Here it was that, guarded by double doors, Sir Francis smoked cigars, and read Bell’s Life in London, and went to sleep after dinner, when he was not smoking over the billiard-table at his clubs, or punting at the gambling-houses in Saint James’s.
  2. (Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, UK) To stake against the bank, to back a horse, to gamble or take a chance more generally
    • 1854, Arthur Pendennis [pseudonym; William Makepeace Thackeray], The Newcomes: Memoirs of a Most Respectable Family, volumes (please specify |volume=I or II), London: Bradbury and Evans, [], →OCLC:
      She heard [] of his punting at gaming tables.
    • 2004, John Buglear, “Is it worth the risk? – introducing probability”, in Quantitative methods for business: the A-Z of QM[3], →ISBN, page 339:
      Whether you want to gamble on a horse race, bet on which player will score first in a game of football, have a punt on a particular tennis player winning a grand slam event, you are buying a chance, a chance which is measured in terms of probability, ‘the odds’.
    • 2006 June 23, Dan Roebuck, “Eriksson's men still worth a punt”, in The Guardian[4]:
      Eriksson's men still worth a punt
    • 2009 November 3, Sarah Collerton, “Cup punt not child's play”, in ABC News[5]:
      Australians have a reputation for being keen to bet on two flies climbing up a wall and today young ones often take a casual classroom punt
  3. (figuratively) To make a highly speculative investment or other commitment, or take a wild guess.
Translations edit

Related terms edit

Etymology 4 edit

Borrowed from Irish punt, from Middle English pund.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt (plural punts)

  1. The Irish pound, used as the unit of currency of Ireland until it was replaced by the euro in 2002.

Further reading edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin pūnctum. Cognate with Spanish and Galician punto and Portuguese ponto.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt m (plural punts)

  1. point (specific location)
  2. (grammar) dot, point (punctuation mark)
  3. (mathematics) point (used for separating the fractional part from the whole part)
  4. dot (used in Morse code)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Dutch edit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from Latin punctum.

Noun edit

punt n (plural punten, diminutive puntje n)

  1. point (a position, place, or spot)
    De schat ligt op dat punt op de kaart.The treasure is located at that point on the map.
    Vanaf dit punt kunnen we de hele stad zien.From this point, we can see the entire city.
    Markeer het punt waar de twee lijnen elkaar kruisen.Mark the point where the two lines intersect.
  2. point (moment in time)
    Op een bepaald punt gaf hij op.At a certain point, he gave up.
    Tot dat punt was alles goed gegaan.Up to that point, everything had gone well.
    Dit is het punt waarop we moeten beslissen.This is the point at which we need to decide.
  3. point (central idea, argument, or opinion of a discussion or presentation)
    Wat is het belangrijkste punt van je presentatie?What is the main point of your presentation?
    Ik snap je punt niet.I don't get your point.
    Ze maakte een interessant punt over klimaatverandering.She made an interesting point about climate change.
  4. point (tally of worth or score, such as in a game)
    Ze scoorde drie punten in de laatste minuut.She scored three points in the last minute.
    Hoeveel punten hebben we nu?How many points do we have now?
    Met nog één punt kunnen we winnen.With just one more point, we can win.
  5. point (mark, note, or grade, as in for a class)
    Ik kreeg 85 punten voor mijn wiskundetoets.I got 85 points for my math exam.
    Hoeveel punten heb je nodig om te slagen?How many points do you need to pass?
    Ze verloor punten vanwege spelfouten.She lost points due to spelling mistakes.
  6. (geometry) point
    In de meetkunde is een punt een locatie zonder omvang.In geometry, a point is a location with no size.
    Teken een punt A op het papier.Draw a point A on the paper.
    Twee punten bepalen een rechte lijn.Two points determine a straight line.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French point, from Latin punctus.

Noun edit

punt m (plural punten, diminutive puntje n)

  1. The terminal point of something
    de punt van een naald of mesthe point of a needle or knife
    de zuidpunt van het eilandthe southern point of the island
  2. dot
    Zet een punt op de i.Put a dot on the i.
    De kaart was bezaaid met punten die belangrijke locaties aangaven.The map was dotted with dots indicating important locations.
    Ze tekende een hartje met een kleine punt erin.She drew a heart with a little dot inside it.
  3. full stop, period
    Zet een punt aan het einde van de zin.Put a full stop at the end of the sentence.
    Ik heb geleerd altijd een punt te gebruiken na een volledige gedachte.I've learned to always use a period after a complete thought.
    Ze schrijft vaak lange zinnen zonder een punt.She often writes long sentences without a full stop.
  4. A pointy slice of a cake, pie or pizza.
    Synonym: taartpunt
Derived terms edit

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Irish punt, from Middle English pund (pound), from Old English pund (a pound, weight), from Proto-Germanic *pundą (pound, weight), from pondus (weight), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)pend- (to pull, stretch).

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint or punta)

  1. pound (unit of weight, unit of currency)
Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From English pound.

Noun edit

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint)

  1. pound (of enclosure)
Declension edit

Etymology 3 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint)

  1. butt(-end)
  2. tip (of finger)
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt

  1. Alternative form of puinn

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
punt phunt bpunt
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading edit

Maltese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Sicilian puntu and/or Italian punto, from Latin punctum.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt m (plural punti)

  1. dot, point
    Synonym: tikka
  2. point (in time or space, an item on a list etc.)
  3. point (unit of scoring in a competition)

Related terms edit

Manx edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Irish punt, from Middle English pund (pound).

Noun edit

punt m (genitive singular punt, plural puint)

  1. (numismatics, unit of measure) pound

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
punt phunt bunt
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt m (definite singular punten, indefinite plural puntar, definite plural puntane)

  1. (glassblowing) punty

Synonyms edit

Old French edit

Noun edit

punt oblique singularm (oblique plural punz or puntz, nominative singular punz or puntz, nominative plural punt)

  1. Alternative form of pont

Romanian edit

Noun edit

punt m (plural punți)

  1. Alternative form of pfund

Declension edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin pōns, pōntem (compare Catalan pont, French pont, Italian ponte, Occitan pònt, Portuguese ponte, Spanish puente), from Proto-Indo-European *pont- (path, road).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt m (plural punts)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) bridge

Slovene edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

pȕnt m inan

  1. revolt

Inflection edit

 
The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Masculine inan., hard o-stem
nom. sing. pùnt
gen. sing. púnta
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
pùnt púnta púnti
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
púnta púntov púntov
dative
(dajȃlnik)
púntu púntoma púntom
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
pùnt púnta púnte
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
púntu púntih púntih
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
púntom púntoma púnti

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Old English pund.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

punt f (plural punnoedd or punnau)

  1. (numismatics) pound (sterling)
    • 1874 May 20, “Llundain a'ch "Ewyrth"”, in Baner ac Amserau Cymru, page 13:
      Costiodd yr holl adeiladau hyn tua deg a thrigain mil o bunnau.
      All these buildings cost about seventy thousand pounds.
  2. (obsolete) pound (weight)
    Synonym: pwys

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
punt bunt mhunt phunt
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “punt”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies