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See also: pugná

Contents

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpuɲa/, [ˈpuɲːa]
  • Hyphenation: pù‧gna

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin pugna, from pugnō (I fight, oppose), from pugnus (fist), from Proto-Indo-European *peuǵ-, *peuḱ- (prick, punch).

NounEdit

pugna f (plural pugne) (obsolete, literary, poetic)

  1. (literally and figuratively) fight, battle, combat
  2. dispute, quarrel

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

pugna (obsolete)

  1. plural of pugno
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto VI, p. 91, vv. 25-27:
      E 'l duca mio distese le sue spanne, ¶ prese la terra, e con piene le pugna, ¶ la gittò dentro a le bramose canne.
      And my Conductor, with his spans extended, ¶ took of the earth, and with his fists well filled, ¶ he threw it into those rapacious gullets.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

pugna

  1. third-person singular present indicative of pugnare
  2. second-person singular imperative of pugnare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pugnō (fight), from pugnus (fist).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pugna f (genitive pugnae); first declension

  1. a fight, battle, combat, action
  2. a line of battle, troops drawn up for battle
  3. a contest, dispute, quarrel

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pugna pugnae
Genitive pugnae pugnārum
Dative pugnae pugnīs
Accusative pugnam pugnās
Ablative pugnā pugnīs
Vocative pugna pugnae

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

pugnā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of pugnō

ReferencesEdit

  • pugna in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pugna in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pugna in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • pugna in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to provoke the enemy to battle: proelio (ad pugnam) hostes lacessere, provocare
    • to decline battle: pugnam detrectare (Liv. 3. 60)
    • to choose suitable ground for an engagement: locum ad pugnam idoneum deligere
    • to fix a day for the engagement: diem pugnae constituere (B. G. 3. 24)
    • to triumph over some one: triumphum agere de or ex aliquo or c. Gen. (victoriae, pugnae)
    • to fight a battle at sea: pugnam navalem facere
    • (ambiguous) the issue of the day was for a long time uncertain: diu anceps stetit pugna
    • (ambiguous) to come off victorious: superiorem (opp. inferiorem), victorem (proelio, pugna) discedere

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin pugna.

NounEdit

pugna f (plural pugnas)

  1. combat; battle; fight
  2. (figuratively) struggle

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

pugna

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of pugnar
  2. second-person singular (tu, sometimes used with você) affirmative imperative of pugnar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

pugna

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of pugnar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of pugnar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of pugnar.