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a fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English salamandre, from Anglo-Norman salamandre, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamándra), of uncertain origin (per Beekes, likely Pre-Greek, possibly from Persian سام (sām) and اندارـــَن (andarūn) meaning "inner fire").

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

salamander (plural salamanders)

  1. A long, slender, chiefly terrestrial amphibian of the order Caudata, superficially resembling a lizard.
    • 1672, Thomas Browne, Pseudodoxia Epidemica, 1852, Simon Wilkin (editor), The Works of Sir Thomas Browne, Volume 1, page 292,
      [] and most plainly Pierius, whose words in his hieroglyphicks are these: "Whereas it is commonly said that a salamander extinguisheth fire, we have found by experience that it is so far from quenching hot coals, that it dyeth immediately therein."
    • 2012 January 1, Douglas Larson, “Runaway Devils Lake”, in American Scientist[2], volume 100, number 1, page 46:
      Devils Lake is where I began my career as a limnologist in 1964, studying the lake’s neotenic salamanders and chironomids, or midge flies. […] The Devils Lake Basin is an endorheic, or closed, basin covering about 9,800 square kilometers in northeastern North Dakota.
  2. (mythology) A creature much like a lizard that is resistant to and lives in fire, hence the elemental being of fire.
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, The Understanding Heart, Chapter XI
      “Not a chance, Ranger,” Bob Mason was speaking. “This little cuss is a salamander. He's been travelling through fire all day and there isn't a blister on him. …”
    • 1849, John Brand, Observations on the Popular Antiquities of Great Britain: Chiefly Illustrating the Origin of Our Vulgar and Provincial Customs, Ceremonies, and Superstitions, Volume 3, page 372
      "There is a vulgar error," says the author of the Brief Natural History, p. 91, "that a salamander lives in the fire. Yet both Galen and Dioscorides refute this opinion; and Mathiolus, in his Commentaries upon Dioscorides, a very famous physician, affirms of them, that by casting of many a salamander into the fire for tryal he found it false. The same experiment is likewise avouched by Joubertus."
  3. (heraldry) A heraldic representation of the mythological creature, always shown in flames.
  4. (cooking) A metal utensil with a flat head which is heated and put over a dish to brown the top.
    • 1977, Richard Daunton-Fear, Penelope Vigar, Australian Colonial Cookery (discussing 19th century cookery), Rigby, 1977, →ISBN, page 41
      The salamander, a fairly long metal utensil with a flat rounded head, was left in the fire until red hot and then used to brown the top of a dish without further cooking.
  5. (cooking) A small broiler (North America) or grill (Britain), used in professional cookery primarily for browning.
    The chef first put the steak under the salamander to sear the outside.
    • 2006, Frank Saxon, editor, Tolley's Industrial and Commercial Gas Installation Practice [Gas Service Technology; 3], 4th edition, Oxford; Burlington, Mass.: Elsevier Newnes, →ISBN, page 35:
      Overfired grills, or salamanders, can, in addition, be used for making toast and salamandering. They have the heat source above the food [] . This may comprise sets of burners firing below refractory or metal frets, or surface combustion plaques.
  6. The pouched gopher, Geomys tuza, of the southern United States.
  7. (Britain, obsolete) A large poker.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  8. (metallurgy) Solidified material in a furnace hearth.

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for salamander in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

salamander (third-person singular simple present salamanders, present participle salamandering, simple past and past participle salamandered)

  1. To use a salamander (cooking utensil) in a cooking process.
    • 19th century (quoted 1977), recipe in Richard Daunton-Fear, Penelope Vigar, Australian Colonial Cookery, Rigby, →ISBN, page 41:
      When cold, sprinkle the custard thickly with sugar and salamander it.
    • 2006, Frank Saxon, editor, Tolley's Industrial and Commercial Gas Installation Practice [Gas Service Technology; 3], 4th edition, Oxford; Burlington, Mass.: Elsevier Newnes, →ISBN, page 35:
      Overfired grills, or salamanders, can, in addition, be used for making toast and salamandering. They have the heat source above the food [] . This may comprise sets of burners firing below refractory or metal frets, or surface combustion plaques.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Joan Beal (2002) English Pronunciation in the Eighteenth Century: Thomas Spence's Grand Repository of the English Language[1], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 110

Further readingEdit


AfrikaansEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch salamander, from Middle Dutch salamander, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamándra).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

salamander (plural salamanders)

  1. salamander, amphibian of the order Caudata

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch salamander, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamándra).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌsaː.laːˈmɑn.dər/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: sa‧la‧man‧der

NounEdit

salamander m (plural salamanders, diminutive salamandertje n)

  1. salamander, amphibian of the order Caudata

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: salamander
  • Indonesian: salamander
  • West Frisian: salamander

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English salamander, From Middle English salamandre, from Old French salamandre, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamándra), of uncertain origin.

NounEdit

salamander m (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. salamander

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
salamander halamander
after "yn", talamander
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch salamander, from Middle Dutch salamander, from Latin salamandra, from Ancient Greek σαλαμάνδρα (salamándra).

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

salamander c (plural salamanders)

  1. salamander, amphibian of the order Caudata