Last modified on 14 April 2015, at 07:41

seduce

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin seducere (to lead apart or astray), from se- (aside, away, astray) + ducere (to lead); see duct. Compare adduce, conduce, deduce, etc.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

seduce (third-person singular simple present seduces, present participle seducing, simple past and past participle seduced)

  1. To beguile or lure someone away from duty, accepted principles, or proper conduct; to lead astray.
    Your father was seduced by the dark side of The Force. - Obi Wan Kenobi, Star Wars
  2. To entice or induce someone to engage in a sexual relationship.
    Mrs. Robinson, are you trying to seduce me? - Benjamin Braddock, The Graduate
  3. (by extension, euphemistic) To have sexual intercourse with.
    He had repeatedly seduced the girl in his car, hotels and his home.
  4. To win over or attract someone.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

seduce

  1. third-person singular present indicative of sedurre

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

sēdūce

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of sēdūcō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sēdūcēre, present active infinitive of sēdūcō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

a seduce 3rd conj.

  1. (transitive) to seduce

Derived termsEdit

ConjugationEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

seduce

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of seducir.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of seducir.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of seducir.