See also: SHO, Sho, Shö, shō, Shō, sho', -sho, -shō, and shō-

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Adverb edit

sho (not comparable)

  1. (Southern US, African-American Vernacular) Pronunciation spelling of sure.
    • 1952, Ralph Ellison, Invisible Man, Penguin Books (2014), page 97:
      “I sho am glad. You sho you all right? I thought sho you was dead this time.”
  2. (childish) Pronunciation spelling of so.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Borrowed from Japanese (shō).

Noun edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

sho (plural shos)

  1. A Japanese free reed musical instrument similar to the sheng.
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Of modern scholarly coinage.

Noun edit

sho (plural shos)

  1. A letter of the Greek alphabet used to write the Bactrian language: uppercase Ϸ, lowercase ϸ.
Translations edit

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Italian edit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English sho, used to illustrate Bactrian ϸ (š). Also compare the archaic Greek character Ϻ (Ś).

Noun edit

sho m or f (invariable)

  1. sho (Greek letter)

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

sho

  1. Rōmaji transcription of しょ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of ショ

Lashi edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

sho

  1. shy

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

sho

  1. hundred
Usage notes edit
  • The term sho has to be preceded by another cardinal number in order to be used as a numeral. Note that the term for "hundred" is written as one word:
    dasho ((a) hundred)
    qøk sho (two hundred)

References edit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Louisiana Creole edit

Etymology edit

From French chaud (hot).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

sho

  1. hot.

References edit

  • Albert Valdman, Dictionary of Louisiana Creole
  • Thomas A. Klingler, If I Could Turn My Tongue Like that: The Creole of ==Pointe Coupee Parish

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronoun edit

sho

  1. (chiefly Northern) Alternative form of sche

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

sho (plural shos or shon)

  1. Alternative form of scho (shoe)

Etymology 3 edit

Verb edit

sho

  1. Alternative form of schon (to shoe)

Navajo edit

Noun edit

sho

  1. frost
    Tłʼéédą́ą́ʼ sho yiigaii jiní.
    It frosted last night, I hear.

Alternative forms edit

Spanish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃo/ [ˈʃo]
  • Rhymes: -o
  • Syllabification: sho

Interjection edit

¡sho!

  1. (Guatemala, colloquial) shush!, hush!
  2. (Guatemala, colloquial) wow!, woah!

Swazi edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀o, derived from Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀ (say, quote).

Verb edit

-sho

  1. to say

Inflection edit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps borrowed from Serbo-Croatian ćao.

Interjection edit

sho

  1. (slang) hi

Usage notes edit

  • Often in "Sho bre!" (Hi, bro!).
  • Usually pronounced identically to the native greeting tjo.

See also edit

  • bre
  • hej (has a list of greetings and farewells)

References edit

Zulu edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀o, derived from Proto-Bantu *-tɪ̀ (say, quote).

Verb edit

-sho

  1. (intransitive) to say
  2. (intransitive) to mean

Inflection edit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms edit

References edit