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See also: HOS, , hös, hős, hoš, hoş, and Hos.

Contents

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hos

  1. plural of ho
    • 2007, January 14, “Henry Alford”, in Books on Broadway[1]:
      talkin’, talkin’ ’bout emperor’s children: ivy league pimps and hos.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Originally an unstressed form of hus (house) undergoing a development in meaning from "at someone's house" to "with someone" – analogous to the development of Latin casa (house) to French chez (at (the house of)).

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

hos

  1. at X's abode
    Vi var på besøg hos Ahmad.
    We visited Ahmad in his abode.
    Jeg sov hos en veninde.
    I slept at a friend's place.
  2. in X's view; as X expresses it in their writings
    • 1877, Fredrik Petersen, Dr. Søren Kierkegaards Christendomsforkyndelse, page 544
      Maalet er hos Kierkegaard som hos Hegel et selvbevidst Liv, der af begge kaldes Aand, ...
      The goal, according to Kierkegaard is, as according to Hegel, a self-conscious life, which both of them call spirit/spirituality, ...
    • 2001, Sundhedsplejerske-institutionens dannelse: en kulturteoretisk og kulturhistorisk analyse af velfaerdsstatens embedsvaerk, Museum Tusculanum Press (ISBN 9788772896793), page 132
      Muligheden for at vælge forkert er hos Hegel til stede.
      The possibility of choosing wrong is present in the view that Hegel expresses.
    • 2015, Svend Brinkmann, Identitet, Klim (ISBN 9788771296150)
      Etik er derfor hos Foucault noget andet end moral, der er det filosofiske studium af gode, rigtige handlinger.
      In Foucault's writings, ethics is therefore different from morality, which is the philosophical study of good, right actions.

ReferencesEdit


DutchEdit

IrishEdit

NounEdit

hos m

  1. h-prothesized form of os

LatinEdit

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Developed from hus.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

PrepositionEdit

hos

  1. at, by, with

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Developed from hus.

PrepositionEdit

hos

  1. at, by, with

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hansō. Cognate with Old High German hansa.

NounEdit

hōs f

  1. escort; company; troop
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

hōs f

  1. bramble
  2. thorn
InflectionEdit

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare Old Swedish i hoss “close by, nearby”; probably from a weak form of Old Swedish hūs (house) (Swedish hus); cognate with Danish hos. Compare Icelandic hjá (at, by) from hjón (married couple), French chez (to/at the house of) from Latin casa (house) and Westrobothnian foss (right away) from fus, fos (eager).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hos

  1. indefinite genitive singular of ho

PrepositionEdit

hos

  1. in the vicinity of
  2. at someone's place or building, usually their home or workplace. Same as Icelandic hjá: Jag är hos djävulen (I am at the devil's place; I am in hell). Johan är hos sig (Johan is at his own place).
  3. with someone (used instead of 'med' with a few static verbs, such as stay): Stanna hos mig! (Stay with me!).

Derived termsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English horse.

NounEdit

hos

  1. horse