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See also: Skipper

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English skippere, skyppere, scippere, from Middle Dutch scipper, schipper and Middle Low German schipper (literally shipper), equivalent to ship +‎ -er. Cognate with Old English sċipere (sailor), Old Norse skipari (mariner).

NounEdit

skipper (plural skippers)

  1. (nautical) The master of a ship.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 10, in The Celebrity:
      The skipper Mr. Cooke had hired at Far Harbor was a God-fearing man with a luke warm interest in his new billet and employer, and had only been prevailed upon to take charge of the yacht after the offer of an emolument equal to half a year's sea pay of an ensign in the navy.
  2. A coach, director, or other leader.
  3. (sports) The captain of a sports team such as football, cricket, rugby or curling.
    • 2010 December 29, Sam Sheringham, “Liverpool 0-1 Wolverhampton”, in BBC:
      But even the return of skipper Steven Gerrard from a six-week injury layoff could not inspire Liverpool
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

skipper (third-person singular simple present skippers, present participle skippering, simple past and past participle skippered)

  1. (transitive) To captain a ship.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English skippere, skyppare, equivalent to skip +‎ -er.

NounEdit

skipper (plural skippers)

  1. Agent noun of skip: one who skips.
  2. A person who skips, or fails to attend class.
  3. Any of various butterflies of the families Hesperiidae and its subfamily Megathyminae, having a hairy mothlike body, hooked tips on the antennae, and a darting flight pattern.
  4. Any of several marine fishes that often leap above water, especially Cololabis saira, the Pacific saury.
  5. (obsolete) A young, thoughtless person.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  6. The cheese maggot, the larva of a cheese fly, in Piophilidae, which leap to escape predators.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for skipper in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English skipper.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skipper m (plural skippers)

  1. skipper

VerbEdit

skipper

  1. to skipper

ConjugationEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English skipper.

NounEdit

skipper m (invariable)

  1. (nautical) skipper (person in charge of a vessel)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German schipper

NounEdit

skipper m (definite singular skipperen, indefinite plural skippere, definite plural skipperne)

  1. (nautical) a skipper

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German schipper

NounEdit

skipper m (definite singular skipperen, indefinite plural skipperar, definite plural skipperane)

  1. (nautical) a skipper

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit