rugby

See also: Rugby

Contents

EnglishEdit

rugby

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

1823: Named after Rugby School in Warwickshire where William Webb Ellis ‘with a fine disregard for the rules of football as played in his time, first took the ball in his arms and ran with it, thus originating the distinctive feature of the rugby game’. The place name Rugby is attested in the Domesday Book as Rocheberie, possibly equivalent to rook +‎ -by.

NounEdit

rugby ‎(countable and uncountable, plural rugbies)

  1. (usually uncountable) A sport where players can hold or kick an ovoid ball. The ball cannot be handled forwards and points are scored by touching the ball to the ground in the area past their opponent’s territory or kicking the ball between goalposts and over a crossbar.
    The scrum is a distinctive element of rugby.
    The two rugbies split following a debate about amateurism.
  2. (countable) A loose fitting shirt with a collar, as worn by rugby players.
    • 2003, B. Lawson Thornton, Misery Loves Company: The Diary of Kerri Mitchell, East River Press (ISBN 9780974018300)
      I don't know why, but for some reason people who work undercover for department store security always wear rugbies and khakis.
    • 2007, Adam Mansbach, Angry Black White Boy: A Novel, Crown (ISBN 9780307419798), page 69
      Jansports and cargo pants were everywhere, set off with overstated polos, rugbies, and sweatshirts blaring the logos of hip hop designers.
    • 2015, Tony Jackson, FROM THE STREETS TO THE SHEETS, Page Publishing Inc (ISBN 9781634171519)
      I bought three jogging suits, a pair of Polo sneakers, and two rugbies.

Usage notesEdit

Rugby is commonly used to refer specifically to the game of rugby union – for example, the Rugby World Cup is a rugby union tournament. Referring to rugby league simply as rugby is less common outside the sport's strongholds.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

rugby ‎(uncountable)

  1. (sports) rugby

CebuanoEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Rugby, (a brand of rubber cement by Bostik)

NounEdit

rugby

  1. rubber cement, contact cement

Etymology 2Edit

From English rugby

NounEdit

rugby

  1. the sport of rugby

CzechEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English rugby (sport).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈragbɪ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rug‧by

NounEdit

rugby n (indeclinable)

  1. rugby [20th c.]
    • 2006, Luboš Jeřábek (transl.), Fotbal – velký lexikon[1], Praha: Grada Publishing, translation of Fussball-Lexikon by Bernd Rohr and Günter Simon, ISBN 80-247-1158-3, page 10:
      Ve škole v Rugby zakládá W. W. Ellis hru rugby (zvanou také rugbyfotbal, na rozdíl od pozdějšího asociačního fotbalu), při které je dovoleno hrát i rukama.
      W. W. Ellis founds a game called rugby (or rugby football, in contrast to later founded association football), in which it is allowed to play with hands, at a school in Rugby.

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit

  • rugby in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • rugby in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rug‧by

NounEdit

rugby n ‎(uncountable)

  1. rugby (sport)

FrenchEdit

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

EtymologyEdit

From English

NounEdit

rugby m ‎(uncountable)

  1. rugby (sport)

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

rugby m ‎(invariable)

  1. rugby (form of football)

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rugby m (uncountable)

  1. rugby

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

rugby m ‎(plural rugbys)

  1. rugby
Read in another language