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EnglishEdit

 
A small amount of slush can be produced from a mixture of rain and snow

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from a Germanic language. Skeat, the author of Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, suggests Old Norse slydda (whence Danish slud).[1] The term is akin to dialectal German Schloße (large hailstone).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sleet (countable and uncountable, plural sleets)

  1. (chiefly Britain, Ireland, New England) A mixture of rain and snow.
    Synonyms: slush, ice pellets
  2. Rain which freezes before reaching the ground.
  3. (firearms) Part of a mortar extending from the chamber to the trunnions.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

sleet (third-person singular simple present sleets, present participle sleeting, simple past and past participle sleeted)

  1. (impersonal, of the weather) To be in a state in which sleet is falling.
    I won't bother going out until it's stopped sleeting.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Skeat (in German) considers the English word “sleet” to be a loanword from Scandinavia and cites the Norwegian word “sletta.”

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sleːt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

sleet ? (uncountable)

  1. wear

SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

sleet

  1. singular past indicative of slijten
  2. second- and third-person singular present indicative of sleeën
  3. (archaic) plural imperative of sleeën

AnagramsEdit