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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /snʌb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English snubben (also snibben), from Old Norse snubba (to curse, chide, snub, scold, reprove). Cognate with Danish snibbe, dialectal Swedish snebba.

AdjectiveEdit

snub (comparative more snub, superlative most snub)

  1. Conspicuously short.
    a snub-nosed revolver
  2. Of the nose: flat and broad, with the end slightly turned up.
    • 1977, Agatha Christie, chapter 2, in An Autobiography, part II, London: Collins, →ISBN:
      If I close my eyes I can see Marie today as I saw her then. Round, rosy face, snub nose, dark hair piled up in a chignon.
  3. (mathematics, of a polyhedron) Derived from a simpler polyhedron by the addition of extra triangular faces.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

snub (plural snubs)

  1. A deliberate affront or slight.
    I hope the people we couldn't invite don't see it as a snub.
    • 2017 January 14, “Thailand's new king rejects the army's proposed constitution”, in The Economist[1]:
      The bluntness of King Vajiralongkorn's intervention—and the determination it reveals to resist relatively small checks on royal power—is both a snub to the junta and a worry for democrats, some of whom had dared hope that the new king might be happy to take a back seat in public life.
  2. A sudden checking of a cable or rope.
  3. (obsolete) A knot; a protuberance; a snag.
    • (Can we date this quote by Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      [A club] with ragged snubs and knotty grain.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

snub (third-person singular simple present snubs, present participle snubbing, simple past and past participle snubbed)

  1. (transitive) To slight, ignore or behave coldly toward someone.
    • 1922, Margery Williams, The Velveteen Rabbit
      For a long time he lived in the toy cupboard or on the nursery floor, and no one thought very much about him. He was naturally shy, and being only made of velveteen, some of the more expensive toys quite snubbed him.
  2. (transitive) To turn down; to dismiss.
    He snubbed my offer of help.
  3. (transitive) To check; to reprimand.
  4. (transitive) To stub out (a cigarette etc).
  5. (transitive) To halt the movement of a rope etc by turning it about a cleat or bollard etc; to secure a vessel in this manner.
  6. (transitive) To clip or break off the end of; to check or stunt the growth of.
SynonymsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

Compare Dutch snuiven (to snort, to pant), German schnauben, German dialect schnupfen (to sob), and English snuff (transitive verb).

VerbEdit

snub (third-person singular simple present snubs, present participle snubbing, simple past and past participle snubbed)

  1. To sob with convulsions.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bailey to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit