See also: Stair

EnglishEdit

 Stair on Wikipedia
 
Stair in Opéra Garnier (Paris)
 
Stair of a building in Bucharest (Romania)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English steire, staire, stayre, stayer, steir, steyre, steyer, from Old English stǣġer (stair, staircase), from Proto-Germanic *staigriz (stairs, scaffolding), from Proto-Indo-European *steygʰ- (to walk, proceed, march, climb). Cognate with Dutch steiger (a stair, step, wharf, pier, scaffolding), Middle Low German steiger, steir (scaffolding), German Low German Steiger (a scaffold; trestle). Related to Old English āstǣġan (to ascend, go up, embark), Old English stīġan (to go, move, reach; ascend, mount, go up, spring up, rise; scale), German Stiege (a flight of stairs). More at sty.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stair (plural stairs)

  1. A single step in a staircase.
    Synonym: step
  2. A series of steps; a staircase.
    • 1899, Hughes Mearns, Antigonish:
      Yesterday, upon the stair / I met a man who wasn’t there / He wasn’t there again today / I wish, I wish he’d go away …

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Stairs and stair are used to refer to a single staircase, mostly interchangeably in the UK.

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IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish stoir, from Latin historia, from Ancient Greek ἱστορίᾱ (historíā). Doublet of stór.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stair f (genitive singular staire, nominative plural startha)

  1. history
  2. account, story
  3. (literary) repute, fame

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