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See also: swą

Contents

Antillean CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French soie.

NounEdit

swa

  1. silk

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Papiamentu swa, from Dutch zwager.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

swa m (plural swa's, diminutive swaatje n)

  1. (slang, Netherlands, Antilles) mate, bud, friend
    Ey swa, alles goed?Oi mate, how you doing?
    Synonyms: gabber, maat, makker, mattie, vriend

AnagramsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

swa

  1. Romanization of 𐍃𐍅𐌰

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French soir (evening)

NounEdit

swa

  1. evening

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *swa, *swē (so), from Proto-Indo-European *swē, *swō and Proto-Indo-European *se. Cognate with Old Frisian sa (West Frisian sa), Old Saxon (Low German so), Old Dutch (Dutch zo), Old High German (German so), Old Norse svá (Icelandic svo, Danish and Swedish , Norwegian so, ), Gothic 𐍃𐍅𐌰 (swa), Latin si (from an earlier form suad), Oscan 𐌔𐌅𐌀𐌝 (svaí), Umbrian sve, Ancient Greek ὡς (hōs) (earlier ϝος (wos)).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

swā

  1. that, of that
    æt menn fīftīene penningas and æt horse healf swā.
    15 pennies for a man, and half that for a horse.

AdverbEdit

swā

  1. so, thus, in this way, in that way
    Weorp þone beall swā.
    Throw the ball like this.
    Hū meaht þū swā libban?
    How can you live that way?
    Nis hit nā swā.
    It is not so.
    And swā æt Engla cyning eall mīn hors.
    And that's how the king of England ate all my horses.
  2. to the extent stated; to a great extent, so, very
    Man meahte swā wīde ġesēon.
    You could see so far.
    Þes sang nis swā gōd.
    This song isn't that good.
    Þū eart swā gōd hund!
    You're such a good dog!
  3. doubled (with an interrogative pronoun) to mean 'whatever', 'whoever', etc
    swā hwæt swā — whatever
    swā hwā swā — whoever
    swā hwǣr swā — wherever
    swā hwider swā — to wherever
    swā hwanan swā — from wherever
    swā hwilċ swā – whichever, whatever kind of
    swā hwǣnne swā — whenever
  4. doubled as a correlative: the...the...
    swā norðor swā smælre.
    The further north, the narrower the land.
  5. doubled as a comparative: as...as...
    swā hwīt swā snāw.
    As white as snow.
  6. used once as a comparative
    • c. 900, the Old English Boethius
      Wēnaþ þā dysiġan þæt ǣlċ mann sīe blind swā hīe sind, and þæt nān mann ne mæġe ġesēon þæt hīe gesēon ne magon.
      Fools think everyone is as blind as they are, and that no one can see what they cannot.

ConjunctionEdit

swā

  1. like, as, the way (often doubled as "swā swā")
    Swā ġē witon, iċ āwēox on Wintanċeastre.
    As you know, I grew up in Winchester.
    swā swā iċ ǣr sæġde
    as I said before
    Iċ bēo simle swā iċ eom.
    I'll always be the way I am.
  2. (temporal) when, while, as
  3. so, with the result that
  4. on condition that

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: swo, so
    • English: so

PapiamentuEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • sua (alternative spelling)

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch zwager (brother-in-law).

NounEdit

swa

  1. friend, pal, comrade
  2. brother-in-law

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

swa

  1. Alternative form of swoja.

Sranan TongoEdit

NounEdit

swa

  1. acid

TswanaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Bantu *-kúa.

VerbEdit

swa

  1. to die