testament

See also: Testament

EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English testament, from Old French testament, from Latin testāmentum (the publication of a will, a will, testament, in Late Latin one of the divisions of the Bible), from testor (I am a witness, testify, attest, make a will), from testis (one who attests, a witness).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɛst.ə.mənt/
  • (file)

NounEdit

testament (plural testaments)

  1. (law) A solemn, authentic instrument in writing, by which a person declares his or her will as to disposal of his or her inheritance (estate and effects) after his or her death, benefiting specified heir(s).
    Synonyms: will, last will and testament, last will
  2. One of the two parts to the scriptures of the Christian religion: the New Testament, considered by Christians to be a continuation of the Hebrew scriptures, and the Hebrew scriptures themselves, which they refer to as the Old Testament.
  3. A tangible proof or tribute.
    The ancient aqueducts are a testament to the great engineering skill of the Roman Empire.
  4. A credo, expression of conviction
    The prime minister's speech was a glowing testament to the cabinet's undying commitment to the royal cause.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum.

NounEdit

testament m (plural testaments)

  1. testament
  2. will (document)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch testament, from Old French testament, from Latin testāmentum (the publication of a will, a will, testament).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɛstaˈmɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: tes‧ta‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

NounEdit

testament n (plural testamenten, diminutive testamentje n)

  1. (law) testament, last will

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Negerhollands: testament
  • Indonesian: testamen

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French testament, from Latin testāmentum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

testament m (plural testaments)

  1. (law) testament, last will
  2. legacy

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum, via Old Norse testament

NounEdit

testament n (definite singular testamentet, indefinite plural testament or testamenter, definite plural testamenta or testamentene)

  1. (law) a will (and/or) testament

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum, via Old Norse testament

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

testament n (definite singular testamentet, indefinite plural testament, definite plural testamenta)

  1. (law) a will, testament (declaration of disposal of inheritance)
  2. (Christianity) a testament (one of the two parts of the Bible)

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum.

NounEdit

testament m (oblique plural testamenz or testamentz, nominative singular testamenz or testamentz, nominative plural testament)

  1. testimony; statement

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɛsˈta.mɛnt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -amɛnt
  • Syllabification: tes‧ta‧ment

NounEdit

testament m inan

  1. (law) will, testament

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

adjectives

Further readingEdit

  • testament in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • testament in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testamentum

NounEdit

testament n (plural testamente)

  1. will

DeclensionEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin testāmentum.

NounEdit

testàment m (Cyrillic spelling теста̀мент)

  1. (law) the (last) will (legal document)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit