English edit

Etymology edit

Unadapted borrowing from Latin vestibulum (a forecourt, entrance court; an entrance). Doublet of vestibule.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

vestibulum (plural vestibula)

  1. (zootomy) A cavity into which, in certain bryozoans, the esophagus and anus open.
  2. (anatomy) The vestibule of the ear.

Derived terms edit

References edit

Latin edit

Etymology edit

Uncertain. Possibilities include:

  • From vestiō (to dress, clothe, vest) +‎ -bulum (place, location, nominal suffix).
  • From unattested *vestis ("a feeding") or *vestus ("fed"), from the Proto-Indo-European root *wes- (to graze).[1]
  • For *verostabulum, from unattested *verus or *verum ("door") (cf. aperiō) and stabulum.[2]
  • From verrō (I sweep)
  • From unattested *vestis, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂wéstis, which is equivalent to Old English wist (being,existence)
  • From vestis +‎ stabulum
  • From vē- +‎ stabulum

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

vestibulum n (genitive vestibulī); second declension

  1. (literally) enclosed space between the entrance of a house and the street, forecourt, entrance court
    Coordinate term: ātrium
    1. (transferred sense) entrance (to anything)
    Synonyms: iānua, ingressus, līmen, initium, porta, ingressiō, foris
    Antonym: abitus
  2. (figurative) beginning
    Synonyms: initium, prīmōrdium, prīncipium, līmen, orīgō, exordium
    Antonym: fīnis

Inflection edit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative vestibulum vestibula
Genitive vestibulī vestibulōrum
Dative vestibulō vestibulīs
Accusative vestibulum vestibula
Ablative vestibulō vestibulīs
Vocative vestibulum vestibula

Descendants edit

References edit

  • vestibulum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • vestibulum”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vestibulum in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • vestibulum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • vestibulum”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • vestibulum”, in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin
  1. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “vestibulum”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 671
  2. ^ Walde, Alois; Hofmann, Johann Baptist (1954), “vestibulum”, in Lateinisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German), volume 2, 3rd edition, Heidelberg: Carl Winter, page 774