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LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *dʰwṓr, from *dʰwer- (door, gate). Cognate with forum, forās, forīs, Sanskrit द्वार् (dvā́r), Ancient Greek θύρα (thúra) and Old English duru and dor (English door).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foris f (genitive foris); third declension

  1. door
  2. gate
  3. opening
  4. entrance
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative foris forēs
Genitive foris forium
Dative forī foribus
Accusative forem forēs
forīs
Ablative fore foribus
Vocative foris forēs
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Old ablative case of some obsolete noun from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (door, gate), whence also forās.

Forīs is mostly of location, forās of direction.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

forīs (not comparable)

  1. outside, outdoors (location)
    Foris cenare.
    To dine outside.
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

forīs

  1. dative plural of forum
  2. ablative plural of forum

ReferencesEdit

  • foris in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • foris in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • foris in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • foris in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) at home; in one's native country: domi (opp. foris)
    • (ambiguous) to knock at the door: ostium, fores pulsare
    • (ambiguous) to open, shut the door: ostium, fores aperire, claudere
    • (ambiguous) to bolt the door: fores obserare