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See also: Vill.

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Anglo-Norman vill, from Old French vile (farm, country estate) (French ville (town)), from Latin villa.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

vill (plural vills)

  1. The smallest administrative unit of land in feudal England, corresponding to the Anglo-Saxon tithing and the modern parish.
  2. (obsolete) A villa; a country residence.
    • 1781, Richard Burn, Ecclesiastical Law (volume 1, page 61)
      Sometimes the kings in their country vills and seats of pleasure or retirement built a place of worship, which was the origin of royal free chapels.

Etymology 2Edit

From will

VerbEdit

vill

  1. Eye dialect spelling of will.

Central FranconianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German filu, from Proto-Germanic *felu.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vill (irregular declension, comparative mieh, superlative et' mietste or mieste or mieschte or määste or määschte)

  1. much; many

Usage notesEdit

  • The adjective is declined regularly after an article or determiner, otherwise it is uninflected.
  • The superlative forms et mie(t)ste, mieschte are Ripuarian, the forms et määste, määschte are Moselle Franconian.

LuxembourgishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German filu, from Proto-Germanic *felu. Cognate with German viel, Dutch veel, English fele.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vill (masculine vill or villen, neuter vill or villt, comparative méi, superlative am meeschten)

  1. much, many
    En huet vill Frënn.
    He has many friends.

Usage notesEdit

  • The positive forms are declined regularly after an article or determiner, otherwise they remain uninflected.
  • The comparative form is indeclinable and cannot be preceded by articles or determiners.
  • The superlative forms are declined in the normal way.

AdverbEdit

vill

  1. much, a lot
    Dat Hiem ass vill ze kleng.
    That shirt is much too small.

ManxEdit

VerbEdit

vill

  1. past of mill

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse villr, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vill (neuter singular vilt, definite singular and plural ville, comparative villere, indefinite superlative villest, definite superlative villeste)

  1. wild

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse villr. Akin to English wild.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vill (neuter singular vilt, definite singular and plural ville, comparative villare, indefinite superlative villast, definite superlative villaste)

  1. wild

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

vill m or f

  1. rare form of ville

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse villr, from Proto-Germanic *wilþijaz. This is cognate with vild (wild), which is influenced from Middle Low German.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vɪl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

vill

  1. (dated) lost (not knowing place or directions)

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

vill

  1. present tense of vilja.

ReferencesEdit

  • vill in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)

VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Finnish villa.

NounEdit

vill

  1. wool