See also: fatigué

English edit

 
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Etymology edit

From French fatigue, from fatiguer, from Latin fatīgāre (to weary, tire, vex, harass).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fəˈtiːɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːɡ

Noun edit

fatigue (countable and uncountable, plural fatigues)

  1. A weariness caused by exertion; exhaustion.
    • 1887, Harriet W. Daly, Digging, Squatting, and Pioneering Life in the Northern Territory of South Australia, page 181:
      My husband stayed for some days with the magistrate at Cardwell, recruiting his health and recovering from his fatigues, for the passage between Cape York and Cardwell had proved the most tedious and anxious part of the voyage.
    • 2012 December 29, Paul Doyle, “Arsenal's Theo Walcott hits hat-trick in thrilling victory over Newcastle”, in The Guardian[1]:
      Alan Pardew finished by far the most frustrated man at the Emirates, blaming fatigue for the fact that Arsenal were able to kill his team off in the dying minutes.
  2. (often in the plural) A menial task or tasks, especially in the military.
    • 1837, L[etitia] E[lizabeth] L[andon], “Opinions”, in Ethel Churchill: Or, The Two Brides. [], volume I, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, page 112:
      Moreover, the habits of business are the most enduring of any; and Lord Norbourne's most positive enjoyment was in what are called the fatigues of office.
  3. (engineering) Weakening and eventual failure of material, typically by cracking leading to complete separation, caused by repeated application of mechanical stress to the material.
    • 2013, N. Dowling, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, page 399:
      Mechanical failures due to fatigue have been the subject of engineering efforts for more than 150 years.
  4. (US) Attributive form of fatigues (military clothing worn when doing menial tasks).
    • 1975, John Crowther, Firebase, New York, N.Y.: St. Martin’s Press, page 107:
      He was slouched in the chair behind the duty officer’s desk, cigarette dangling from his lips, hands thrust deep into his fatigue pockets, making a display of his disrespect. The acting clerk, cowering behind his own desk, was either afraid to insist he assume a more military posture, or else didn’t care.
    • 1998, William T. Craig, Team Sergeant: A Special Forces NCO at Lang Vei and Beyond, New York, N.Y.: Ivy Books, →ISBN, page 27:
      He reluctantly took the map from his camouflage fatigue pocket.
    • 2013, Gavin G. Smith, Crysis: Escalation, London: Gollancz, →ISBN, page 186:
      Chino took a laminated map out of one of his fatigue pockets and gave it to Harper.
    • 2014, Dalton Fury, Full Assault Mode, New York, N.Y.: St. Martin’s Press, →ISBN, page 139:
      Spencer came with all the soft-skill attributes of a desk officer. Double chin, bulging belly testing the tensile strength of the lower two buttons of his fatigue top, and wired-rimmed glasses that sat atop a pointed nose with mismatched nostrils.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

Verb edit

fatigue (third-person singular simple present fatigues, present participle fatiguing, simple past and past participle fatigued)

  1. (transitive) To tire or make weary by physical or mental exertion.
  2. (transitive, cooking) To wilt a salad by dressing or tossing it.
    • 1927, Dorothy L. Sayers, chapter 1, in Unnatural Death:
      The handsome, silver-haired proprietor was absorbed in fatiguing a salad for a family party.
  3. (intransitive) To lose so much strength or energy that one becomes tired, weary, feeble or exhausted.
  4. (intransitive, engineering, of a material specimen) To undergo the process of fatigue; to fail as a result of fatigue.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To cause to undergo the process of fatigue.
    The repeated pressurization cycles fatigued the airplane's metal skin until it eventually broke up in flight.

Related terms edit

Translations edit

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Further reading edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fatigue f (plural fatigues)

  1. fatigue, weariness

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Verb edit

fatigue

  1. inflection of fatigar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

Spanish edit

Verb edit

fatigue

  1. inflection of fatigar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative