Last modified on 16 August 2014, at 20:51

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From many Spanish or Italian words that end in o.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. (humorous) Converts certain words to faux Italian or Spanish.
    no problemo

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps from a special use of the interjection O, oh; and/or perhaps from o (one), from Middle English o, oo, variant of a, on, oon, an (one). More at one.

SuffixEdit

-o (plural -os or -oes)

  1. A diminutive suffix.
Usage notesEdit
  • -o is generally applied to nouns, but sometimes adjectives, such as agro. It may also be applied to certain given names or surnames, often with elision and sometimes from an already shortened form, to create a nickname form — e.g., Jacko from Jack, Davo from Dave, Smitho from Smith.
Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Back-formation from typo.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. An error of a specific type.
Derived termsEdit

EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

  • From the masculine singular of the Romance languages, such as Italian (amico); perhaps also the neuter singular of Russian (окно (okno))
  • Perhaps from the above (Italian quello, Russian то (to))

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Nominal suffix. Most Esperanto nouns end in -o. (A few nouns end in -aŭ, and with some writers some feminine names end in -a.)
  2. -thing. (correlative object ending.)
    • kio (what?, what)
    • tio (that)
    • ĉio (everything)
    • io (something)
    • nenio (nothing)

FinnishEdit

SuffixEdit

-o (front vowel harmony variant )

  1. Forms result or action nouns from verbs.
    huutaa (shout) → huuto (shout)
    keittää (boil, cook) → keitto (cooking; soup)
    nähdä (see) → näkö (vision) (ability to see)
  2. Forms variants from a few nominal roots.
    hilla (cloudberry) → hillo (jam)
    kanta (base) → kanto (tree stump)
    tasa (level) → taso (plane)

Usage notesEdit

  • Used deverbally especially with those verbs whose citation form ends with -aa or -ää. In stems with e or i, the suffix has its back vowel form, -o.

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Corresponds to -ot, -au

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. added to a noun or an adjective after apocope, to create a familiar synonym

Derived termsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Esperanto -o, from Romance languages.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Nominal suffix. All Ido nouns end in -o.

ItalianEdit

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Used with a stem to form the first-person singular present of regular are and ere verbs and those -ire verbs that do not take -isc-

Lower SorbianEdit

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. -ly (used to turn an adjective into an adverb of manner)

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Forms adverbs from adjectives.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: -e

Old High GermanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Forms adverbs from adjectives.
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle High German: -e

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ô. Cognate to Old English -a, in ǣta (eater), Gothic -𐌰 (-a), in 𐌽𐌿𐍄𐌰 (nuta, fisher). In some cases, the root appears in the zero-grade as in boto (from biotan).

SuffixEdit

-o m

  1. used to form masculine agents from verbs
    geban (to give) → gëbo (giver)
    sprehhan (to speak) → sprëhho (speaker)
    biotan (to offer, send, command) → boto (messenger)
    ziohan (to pull, lead) → herizogo (army leader)
    sagēn (to say) → fora-sago (prophet)
DeclensionEdit

Most nouns with this suffix follow the n-declension, like hano (cock), namo (name), gomo (man).

DescendantsEdit
  • German: -e
  • Middle High German: -e

In Middle High German, the suffix is replaced by -er (whence German -er), as in Middle High German gëber instead of Old High German gëbo. Only a few German words still have a final -e that results from Old High German -o.


Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ô.

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. Forms adverbs from adjectives.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ô. Cognate to Old English -a, in ǣta (eater), Gothic -𐌰 (-a), in 𐌽𐌿𐍄𐌰 (nuta, fisher).

SuffixEdit

-o m

  1. used to form masculine agents from verbs and nouns
    gevan (to give) → gevo (giver)
    beddi (bed) → gibeddio (bedfellow)
DescendantsEdit
  • Middle Low German: -e

PortugueseEdit

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. forms the 1st-person singular present indicative of verbs

SpanishEdit

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. suffix indicating the first-person singular present indicative of verbs

VolapükEdit

SuffixEdit

-o

  1. adverb ending
  2. -wise (in the matter of; with regard to)

Derived termsEdit