See also: Mix

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English mixen, from Old English mixian, miscian (to blend, mix, combine), from Proto-Germanic *miskijaną (to mix), from Proto-Indo-European *meiǵ-, *meiḱ- (to mix). Cognate with Old High German miskian, miskan (German mischen, to mix), Welsh mysgu (to mix), Latin misceō (mix, verb), Ancient Greek μίγνυμι (mignumi, to mix), Old Church Slavonic [script?] (mieshati, to mix), Lithuanian mišti and maišyti (to mix), Albanian mushk (a mule, lit. a mixed animal), Sanskrit [script?] (miçro, mixed), Old English māsc (mixture, mash)[1]. More at mash.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

mix (third-person singular simple present mixes, present participle mixing, simple past and past participle mixed or mixt)

  1. To stir two or more substances together.
    Mix the eggs and milk with the flour until the consistency is smooth.
  2. To combine items from two or more sources normally kept separate.
    to mix business with pleasure
    Don't mix the meat recipes with the dairy recipes.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      fair persuasions mixed with sugared words
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, Death on the Centre Court:
      She mixed furniture with the same fatal profligacy as she mixed drinks, and this outrageous contact between things which were intended by Nature to be kept poles apart gave her an inexpressible thrill.
  3. To form by mingling; to produce by the stirring together of ingredients; to compound of different parts.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      Hast thou no poison mixed?
    • Francis Bacon (1561-1626)
      I have chosen an argument mixed of religious and civil considerations.
    • 1935, George Goodchild, chapter 1, Death on the Centre Court:
      She mixed furniture with the same fatal profligacy as she mixed drinks, and this outrageous contact between things which were intended by Nature to be kept poles apart gave her an inexpressible thrill.
  4. To use a mixer (machine) on.
    Mix the egg whites until they are stiff.
  5. (music) To combine several tracks.
    I'll mix the rhythm tracks down to a single track.
  6. (music) To produce a finished version of a recording.
    I'm almost done mixing this song.
  7. To unite with in company; to join; to associate.
    • Bible, Hoseah vii. 8
      Ephraim, he hath mixed himself among the people.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

mix (plural mixes)

  1. The result of mixing two or more substances; a mixture.
    Now add the raisins to the mix.
  2. The result of combining items normally kept separate.
    My recipe file was now a mix of meat and dairy.
    The combination of classical music and hip hop is a surprisingly good mix.
  3. (music) The result of mixing several tracks.
    The rhythm mix sounds muddy.
  4. (music) The finished version of a recording.
    I've almost finished the mix for this song.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Skeat, An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, "Mix."

External linksEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Andalusian Arabic مش (mašš).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mix m (plural mixos, feminine mixa)

  1. (usually repeated) A sound used to call a domestic cat.
  2. (colloquial) The domestic cat.

SynonymsEdit

  • (domestic cat): gat, moix

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

mix

  1. Imperative singular of mixen.
  2. (colloquial)First-person singular present of mixen.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mix

  1. rafsi of mixre.
Last modified on 16 April 2014, at 22:20