Last modified on 26 September 2014, at 17:44
See also: Mus, mūs, and mús

BasqueEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier mux, from French mouche (fly).

NounEdit

mus

  1. (card games) A traditional Basque card game.

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús, from Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *muH₁s- (mouse).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /muːs/, [muːˀs]

NounEdit

mus c (singular definite musen, plural indefinite mus)

  1. mouse

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus m (plural mussen, diminutive musje n)

  1. sparrow

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

mus

  1. first-person singular past historic of mouvoir
  2. second-person singular past historic of mouvoir
  3. masculine plural past participle of mouvoir

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *muh₂s. Cognates include Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Sanskrit मूष् (mūṣ), Old English mūs (English mouse), Proto-Slavic *myšь (Russian мышь (myšʹ)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs m, f (genitive muris); third declension

  1. mouse, rat

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Number Singular Plural
nominative mūs murēs
genitive muris murium
dative murī muribus
accusative murem murēs
murīs
ablative mure muribus
vocative mūs murēs

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • mus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mùs

  1. (first-person plural) accusative form of mes.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

mus

  1. rafsi of muslo.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus f, m

  1. mouse
  2. (slang) the female genitalia

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse mús.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus f

  1. mouse
  2. (slang) the female genitalia

InflectionEdit


NovialEdit

VerbEdit

mus

  1. (auxiliary) have to, must

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *mūs.

Germanic cognates: Old Frisian mūs, Old Saxon mūs (German Low German Muus, Dutch muis), Old High German mūs (German Maus), Old Norse mús (Danish mus, Faroese mús, Icelandic mús, Norwegian, mus, Swedish mus)

Indo-European cognates: Ancient Greek μῦς (mûs), Latin mūs, Old Armenian մուկն (mukn), Old Church Slavonic мъшь (mŭšĭ) (Russian мышь (myšʹ), Albanian mi

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs f

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mūs, from Proto-Indo-European *mūs. Cognate with Old Frisian mūs, Old English mūs, German Low German Muus, Dutch muis, Old High German mūs (German Maus), Old Norse mús (Norwegian mus, Swedish mus)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mūs f

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

mus m (uncountable)

  1. (card games) card game that is very popular in Spain

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mus c

  1. mouse; small rodent of the genus Mus; especially species Mus musculus
  2. (computing) a computer mouse; an input device
  3. (colloquial) a pussy; female genitalia

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

animal
computers

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


UnamiEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

mus

  1. moose

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.