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Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

The word is first attested in Homer, Iliad 7.206. Believed to be a borrowed word, perhaps from Urartian 𒁓𒂵𒈾 (bur-ga-na /burgana/, pillar, column; altar, base, or built-up foundation), however this may itself be a loan with no known Hurrian cognate; compare also Old Armenian բուրգն (burgn, pyramid). Others connect the word to Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (high), with cognates including Sanskrit बृहत् (bṛhát, lofty, high, tall), Old Armenian բարձր (barjr, high) and Old English burg (English borough). Kretschmer suggested a borrowing from Proto-Germanic *burgz (fortified town, hill-fort) mediated through some Northern Balkans language (Ancient Macedonian?). For Beekes, the abundance of Pre-Greek placenames, like e. g. Πέργαμον (Pérgamon), seems to indicate a Pre-Greek origin.

PronunciationEdit

 

NounEdit

πῠ́ργος (púrgosm (genitive πῠ́ργου); second declension

  1. tower, watchtower
  2. (in the plural) towered wall
  3. the part of the house where women live
  4. castle, fortress, bulwark
  5. (military) division, column

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit


GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πύργος (púrgos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpirɣos/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: πύρ‧γος

NounEdit

πύργος (pýrgosm (plural πύργοι)

  1. tower
    κεντρικός πύργοςkentrikós pýrgoscentral tower, castle keep
  2. (chess) rook

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Chess pieces in Greek · πεσσοί (pessoí) (layout · text)
           
βασιλιάς (vasiliás) βασίλισσα (vasílissa) πύργος (pýrgos) αξιωματικός (axiomatikós), τρελός (trelós) ίππος (íppos) στρατιώτης (stratiótis), πιόνι (pióni)