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See also: Burg and -burg

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz (borough, fortification).

NounEdit

burg (plural burgs)

  1. (Canada, US) A city or town.
    • 1921, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Efficiency Expert[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2012:
      Tell mother that I will write her in a day or two, probably from Chicago, as I have always had an idea that that was one burg where I could make good.
    • 2009 June, Thriault, David, “This Way In: The Sound and the Fury”, in Esquire, volume 151, number 6, page 6:
      Imagine my surprise when I learned that he was not only a Canadian but lived in Ottawa, that icy burg I had left so many kilometers -- sorry, miles -- behind me.
    • 2010 Feb, Orloff, Paige, “Big Style on a (Little) Budget”, in Country Living, volume 33, number 2, page 84:
      It's been said that Wilder modeled that fictional setting on Peterborough, a quaint burg tucked away in New Hampshire's verdant southwestern hills.
  2. (historical) A fortified town in medieval Europe.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

burg (plural burgs)

  1. (slang) burger
    • 2002, Ricard Marx Weinraub, Wonder Bread Hill, page 6:
      I hate this emptiness and the redundancy of eating burgs at Burger Town.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz (borough, fortification).

NounEdit

burg m (indefinite plural burgje, definite singular burgu, definite plural burgjet)

  1. jail, prison. (brig)

SynonymsEdit


IrishEdit

NounEdit

burg m (genitive singular buirg, nominative plural buirg)

  1. Alternative form of buirg (borough)

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
burg bhurg mburg
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

  • "burg" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Entries containing “burg” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “burg” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burg f (nominative plural byriġ)

  1. city, town
    Sceal sēo burg bīdan.
    The city shall remain
  2. stronghold, fort, castle
  3. dwelling-place

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation). Cognate with Old Saxon burg, Frankish *burg, Old English burh, Old Norse borg, Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌲𐍃 (baurgs). Also related to Old High German berg and more distantly to Latin fortis.

NounEdit

burg ?

  1. a castle
  2. a city

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burg f

  1. fort, castle
    • Heliand, verse 4187:
      imu thô an Effrem an theru hôhon burg uunodehe then lived in the high fort of Effrem
  2. city, town
    • Genesis, verse 238:
      bûan an them burugiumto live in these cities

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit