See also: Burg and -burg

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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The historical sense is from Late Latin burgus, from Frankish *burg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz (borough, fortification). Doublet of borough, Brough, burgh, burh, and bury. Also compare burgess.

The modern sense may have been formed in part by analogy with the many North American city names that are suffixed with -burg (a number of which in the Eastern United States once used -burgh instead. See burgh), as well as being formed in part due to German Burg.

Noun

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burg (plural burgs)

  1. (Canada, US) A city or town.
    • 1921, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Efficiency Expert[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2012:
      Tell mother that I will write her in a day or two, probably from Chicago, as I have always had an idea that that was one burg where I could make good.
    • 2009 June, David Thriault, “This Way In: The Sound and the Fury”, in Esquire, volume 151, number 6, page 6:
      Imagine my surprise when I learned that he was not only a Canadian but lived in Ottawa, that icy burg I had left so many kilometers -- sorry, miles -- behind me.
    • 2010 Feb, Paige Orloff, “Big Style on a (Little) Budget”, in Country Living, volume 33, number 2, page 84:
      It's been said that Wilder modeled that fictional setting on Peterborough, a quaint burg tucked away in New Hampshire's verdant southwestern hills.
  2. (historical) A fortified town in medieval Europe.
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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burg (plural burgs)

  1. (slang) burger
    • 2002, Ricard Marx Weinraub, Wonder Bread Hill, page 6:
      I hate this emptiness and the redundancy of eating burgs at Burger Town.

Anagrams

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Albanian

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Etymology

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Possibly borrowed from Late Latin burgus (fortress, watchtower),[1] perhaps ultimately from Proto-Germanic *burgz (fortress),[2] or possibly borrowed from Ancient Greek πύργος (púrgos, watchtower, fortress),[3] although this is difficult given the initial b- in Albanian.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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burg m (plural burgje, definite burgu, definite plural burgjet)

  1. jail, prison
    Synonyms: hapsane f, haps m, quzë f, quar m

Declension

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References

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  1. ^ Miklosich, Franz (1871) Albanische Forschungen II. Die romanischen Elemente im Albanischen (in German), Vienna: Karl Gerold’s Sohn
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir (1997) “New Albanian Etymologies”, in Indo-European, Nostratic & Beyond: Festschrift for Vitalij V. Shevoroshkin (Journal of Indo-European Studies Monograph), Washington: Institute for the Study of Man, →ISBN, page 258
  3. ^ Camarda, Demetrio (1864) Saggio di grammatologia comparata sulla lingua albanese (in Italian), volume II, Livorno: Successore di Egisto Vignozzi, page 145

Further reading

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Catalan

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Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

Etymology

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Borrowed from Late Latin burgus, from Frankish *burg (fortress).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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burg m (plural burgs)

  1. (historical) a fortified settlement, fortress
  2. (historical) the outskirts of a city, suburbs
    Synonym: ravals

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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burg f (plural burgen, diminutive burgje n)

  1. Alternative form of burcht, now rarely used outside names.

Irish

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Noun

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burg m (genitive singular buirg, nominative plural buirg)

  1. Alternative form of buirg (borough)

Declension

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Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
burg bhurg mburg
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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Old Dutch

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *burg, from Proto-Germanic *burgz.

Noun

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burg f

  1. fortress, castle
  2. city

Inflection

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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  • Middle Dutch: borch, burch
    • Dutch: burg, burcht
    • Limburgish: bórg, börch

Further reading

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  • burg”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *burgz.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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burg f (nominative plural byrġ)

  1. city or town
    • c. 897, King Alfred's translation of Pope Gregory's Pastoral Care
      Wyrċaþ fæsten ymb þā burg.
      Build a fortress around the city.
    • late 9th century, translation of Orosius’ History Against the Pagans
      Þæt Ēstland is swīðe miċel, and þǣr biþ swīðe manega byrġ, and on ǣlcre byrġ biþ cyning.
      Estonia is very large. There are a whole lot of towns, and every town has a king.
    • late 9th century, King Alfred's translation of St. Augustine's Soliloquies
      Nāt iċ nā þȳ hwā Rōme burg timbrede þe iċ hit self ġesāwe, ac for þȳ þe hit man mē sæġde.
      I don't know who built the city of Rome because I saw it myself, but because somebody told me.
    • c. 992, Ælfric, "The Assumption of the Blessed Mary"
      Sē Godes wiðersaca hine þā ġehāthierte and cwæþ, "Þā iċ fram fierde ġeċierre, iċ tōweorpe þās burg, and hīe ġesmēðe, and tō ierþlande āwende, swā þæt hēo biþ cornbǣru swīðor þonne manbǣru."
      The adversary of God became furious and said, "When I return from the campaign, I will destroy this city, and level it, and turn it into farmland, so it is full of grain instead of people."
  2. fortified place: fortress, castle
    • c. 897, King Alfred's translation of Pope Gregory's Pastoral Care
      Sēo burg þæs mōdes sċeal swīðe oft ġefrēdan hire fēonda speru.
      The fortress of the mind must very often feel the spears of its enemies.
    • Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Manuscript A, year 921
      Þā fōr Ēadweard cyning mid Westseaxna fierde tō Colneċeastre and ġebētte þā burg and ġeednīewode þǣr hēo ǣr tōbrocen wæs.
      Then King Edward traveled to Colchester with the West Saxon army and repaired the fortress, and rebuilt it where it had been destroyed.

Declension

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Synonyms

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Derived terms

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Descendants

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Old High German

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *burg, Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation).

Noun

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burg f

  1. a castle
  2. a city

Declension

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Descendants

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References

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  1. Köbler, Gerhard, Althochdeutsches Wörterbuch, (6. Auflage) 2014

Old Saxon

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *burg, Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (fortified elevation).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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burg f

  1. fort, castle
    • 830 A.D. Heliand, verse 4187:
      imu thô an Effrem an theru hôhon burg uunodehe then lived in the high fort of Effrem
  2. city, town
    • (Can we date this quote?) Genesis, verse 238:
      bûan an them burugiumto live in these cities

Declension

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Descendants

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French bourg.

Noun

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burg n (plural burguri)

  1. burg, market town

Declension

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