See also: Burg and -burg

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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NounEdit

burg ‎(plural burgs)

  1. (Canada, US) A city or town.
    • 1921, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Efficiency Expert[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2012:
      Tell mother that I will write her in a day or two, probably from Chicago, as I have always had an idea that that was one burg where I could make good.
    • 2009 June, Thriault, David, “This Way In: The Sound and the Fury”, in Esquire, volume 151, number 6, page 6:
      Imagine my surprise when I learned that he was not only a Canadian but lived in Ottawa, that icy burg I had left so many kilometers -- sorry, miles -- behind me.
    • 2010 Feb, Orloff, Paige, “Big Style on a (Little) Budget”, in Country Living, volume 33, number 2, page 84:
      It's been said that Wilder modeled that fictional setting on Peterborough, a quaint burg tucked away in New Hampshire's verdant southwestern hills.
  2. (historical) A fortified town in medieval Europe.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz(borough, fortification).

NounEdit

burg m (indefinite plural burgje, definite singular burgu, definite plural burgjet)

  1. jail, prison. (brig)

SynonymsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-(fortified elevation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burg f

  1. city, town
    Sceal seó burg bÍdan — the city shall remain
  2. stronghold, fort, castle
  3. dwelling-place

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-(fortified elevation). Cognate with Old Saxon burg, Frankish *burg, Old English burh, Old Norse borg, Gothic 𐌱𐌰𐌿𐍂𐌲𐍃(baurgs). Also related to Old High German berg and more distantly to Latin fortis.

NounEdit

burg ?

  1. a castle
  2. a city

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *burgz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-(fortified elevation).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

burg f

  1. fort, castle
    imu thô an Effrem an theru hôhon burg uunode — he then lived in the high fort of Effrem (Heliand, verse 4187)
  2. city, town
    bûan an them burugium — to live in these cities (Genesis, verse 238)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit