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EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit चीन(cīna).

Proper nounEdit

चीन ‎(cīnm ‎(Urdu spelling چین)

  1. China

NepaliEdit

Proper nounEdit

चीन ‎(cīn), pronounced चिन् (cin)

  1. China

SanskritEdit

EtymologyEdit

Of uncertain etymology, but usually held to derive from Old Chinese (*Dzin, Qin). See "Names of China" at Wikipedia.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

चीन ‎(cīnam

  1. the Chinese (Mn.. X, 44, MBh. II f., vf. R. IV, 44, 14, Lalit., Jain., Car., VarBṛS.)
  2. a kind of deer (L.)
  3. proso millet, Panicum miliaceum (also spelled चिन्न​(cinna)) (L.)
  4. thread (L.)

DeclensionEdit

Masculine a-stem declension of चीन
Nom. sg. चीनः(cīnaḥ)
Gen. sg. चीनस्य(cīnasya)
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative चीनः(cīnaḥ) चीनौ(cīnau) चीनाः(cīnāḥ)
Vocative चीन(cīna) चीनौ(cīnau) चीनाः(cīnāḥ)
Accusative चीनम्(cīnam) चीनौ(cīnau) चीनान्(cīnān)
Instrumental चीनेन(cīnena) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनैः(cīnaiḥ)
Dative चीनाय(cīnāya) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनेभ्यः(cīnebhyaḥ)
Ablative चीनात्(cīnāt) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनेभ्यः(cīnebhyaḥ)
Genitive चीनस्य(cīnasya) चीनयोः(cīnayoḥ) चीनानाम्(cīnānām)
Locative चीने(cīne) चीनयोः(cīnayoḥ) चीनेषु(cīneṣu)

Derived termsEdit

Usually held to be the source of:

NounEdit

चीन ‎(cīnan

  1. banner (L.)
  2. a bandage for the corners of the eyes (Suśr. i, 18, 11)
  3. lead (L.)

DeclensionEdit

Neuter a-stem declension of चीन
Nom. sg. चीनम्(cīnam)
Gen. sg. चीनस्य(cīnasya)
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative चीनम्(cīnam) चीने(cīne) चीनानि(cīnāni)
Vocative चीन(cīna) चीने(cīne) चीनानि(cīnāni)
Accusative चीनम्(cīnam) चीने(cīne) चीनानि(cīnāni)
Instrumental चीनेन(cīnena) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनैः(cīnaiḥ)
Dative चीना(cīnā) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनेभ्यः(cīnebhyaḥ)
Ablative चीनात्(cīnāt) चीनाभ्याम्(cīnābhyām) चीनेभ्यः(cīnebhyaḥ)
Genitive चीनस्य(cīnasya) चीनयोः(cīnayoḥ) चीनानाम्(cīnānām)
Locative चीने(cīne) चीनयोः(cīnayoḥ) चीनेषु(cīneṣu)

ReferencesEdit

  • Sir Monier Monier-Williams (1898) A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages, Oxford: Clarendon Press, page 0399