See also: jin, jín, jìn, jīn, Jīn, jǐn, and -jin

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Etymology 1 edit

 
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The atonal Hanyu Pinyin romanization of the Mandarin pronunciation of Chinese (Jìn), adopted as the name of a river in Shanxi in antiquity. As a Zhou state, from the renaming of the marchland Tang () by its second marquis Ji Xie when he relocated to the Jin River c. 1000 BC. As a surname, principally from the Zhou state and its region in China. As an empire and dynastic name, from Sima Yan's status as prince of Jin under the preceding Wei Empire. As a river in Fujian, named for the empire, which settled its banks with colonizers from China's Central Plains. As a dialect, from 晉語晋语 (Jìnyǔ), from the region of the former Zhou state.

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A river () in Shanxi Province, China, emptying into the Fen River. The template Template:rfc-sense does not use the parameter(s):
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    (Can we clean up(+) this sense?)
  2. (historical) A marchland (c. 1046–677 BC) and duchy (677–376 BC) of the Zhou Kingdom around the river.
  3. A Chinese surname.
  4. (historical) A titular principality of the Wei Empire (est. AD 264) and other later Chinese states.
  5. (historical) An empire in China (AD 265–420) established by Sima Yan's overthrow of the Wei and replaced by barbarian conquerors in the north and Liu Yu's Song Empire in the south.
  6. (historical) Synonym of Sima: the dynasty which ruled this empire.
  7. (historical, chiefly Chinese contexts) The late 3rd to early 5th century, the era during which the Sima clan were the legitimate emperors of China.
  8. A river (Jin River, 晉江晋江 (Jìnjiāng)) in Quanzhou Municipality, Fujian, China, emptying into the Taiwan Strait.
    • 1984, Zhuang Weiji, quotee, Jews in Old China: Studies by Chinese Scholars[2], Hippocrene Books, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, page 147:
      Between 1946 and 1948 in the ruins of the foundations of Quanzhou’s South Gate Tower and southern wall we excavated more that twenty large white gravestones, inscribed in Arabic on both sides. They obviously had been taken from a demolished Islamic mosque. The area overlooked in the Jin River and was known as South Quanzhou, or the “Foreign District.” It was here that merchants from overseas and their families had lived during Song and Yuan.
    • 2010, Tim Mackintosh-Smith, “China: To the Mosque of the Phoenix”, in Landfalls: On the Edge of Islam from Zanzibar to the Alhambra[3], John Murray, published 2011, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 200:
      Wang Feng and I made our way to the world’s former greatest harbour. It is to the west of the city on the Jin River, and far enough inland from Quanzhou Bay to be reasonably safe from typhoons.
    • 2016, “Fujian”, in China[4], DK, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 297, column 1:
      Located on the Jin River, Quanzhou was China’s principal port during the Song and Yuan dynasties.
    • 2023 February 8, Kelvin Chen, “Swiss parliamentarian delegation visits Taiwan's Kinmen”, in Taiwan News[5], archived from the original on 08 March 2023, Politics‎[6]:
      He said that four years ago, the island began receiving water from the Jin River, in Quanzhou, China, and now 70-80% of Kinmen's water comes from China.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:Jin.
  9. (historical) A prefecture of imperial China centered on Linfen, Shanxi.
  10. (historical) Former name of Linfen as the seat of the prefecture.
  11. (historical) An realm in early-10th century Shaanxi loyal to the Tang after their overthrow by the Later Liang.
  12. (historical) The Later Jin, a short-lived empire in 10th-century Shaanxi; the 930s and '40s, the era of this empire.
  13. (historical) Synonym of Shi: the dynasty which ruled this empire.
  14. (linguistics) A Chinese dialect family (code cjy) spoken by about 45 million people in Shanxi and adjacent provinces.
Synonyms edit
Hyponyms edit
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Korean 진(晉) (jin).

 
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Alternative forms edit

Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A Korean surname.

Etymology 3 edit

From the atonal Hanyu Pinyin[1] romanization of Mandarin (Jīn, literally gold, golden). As a surname, legendarily derived from the descendants of Shaohao who took a golden phoenix as their tribal emblem. As an area and town in Shaanxi, named for the placer deposits of gold on the Yue River. As a Jurchen empire and dynastic name, a Chinese calque of Jurchen name of the Ashi River within modern Harbin, preserved in Chinese transcription as 按出虎 (Ànchūhǔ) (Middle Chinese: ʔan-tsyhwit-xu). As a Manchu empire and dynastic name, an early continuation of the former Jurchen name prior to the 1636 proclamation of the Qing.

 
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Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A Chinese surname, given 29th among the Hundred Family Surnames.
  2. (historical) A prefecture of imperial China centered on Ankang, Shaanxi.
  3. (historical) Former name of Ankang as the seat of the prefecture.
  4. (historical) An empire in northern China (AD 1115–1234) established by an invasion of Liao by the Wanyan Jurchens and overthrown by an invasion of the Mongols.
  5. (historical) Synonym of Wanyan: the dynasty which ruled this empire.
  6. (historical, ethnography, uncommon) Synonym of Jurchen: the Tungusic people who ruled this empire.
  7. (historical, chiefly Chinese contexts) The 12th to early 13th century, the era during which the Wanyan clan were the legitimate emperors of northern China.
  8. (historical) Synonym of Qing: the Chinese empire, dynasty, and era, (particularly) during the years 1616 to 1636, prior to the formal declaration of the Qing.
Synonyms edit
Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ “Selected Glossary”, in The Cambridge Encyclopedia of China[1], Cambridge University Press, 1982, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, pages 476, 477:The glossary includes a selection of names and terms from the text in the Wade-Giles transliteration, followed by Pinyin, [] Chin (Jin)

Etymology 4 edit

From the atonal Hanyu Pinyin romanization of Chinese (Jǐn).

 
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Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A river () in Jiangxi and Guangdong provinces in China, emptying into the Bei or North River.
  2. A river () in Sichuan Province, China, emptying into the Min River.
  3. A river (錦江 (贛江支流)) in Jiangxi Province, China, emptying into the Gan River.
  4. (historical) A prefecture of imperial China centered on Luyang, Hunan.
  5. (historical) Former name of Luyang as the seat of the prefecture.
Synonyms edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 5 edit

From the atonal Hanyu Pinyin romanization of Chinese (Jìn). As a surname, legendarily derived from Zhurong.

 
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Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A Chinese surname.
  2. A river () in Hunan Province, China, emptying into the Xiang River.
    Synonym: Jinjiang

Etymology 6 edit

From the revised romanization of Korean (jin). As an ancient kingdom, originally from Chinese (chén, 5th earthly branch), possibly used by the ancient state from its association with "east". As the medieval precursor of Balhae, originally Chinese , possibly intended as a variant of the original state's name (Middle Chinese: dzyin) or to signify "thunderclap", "shock", "tremor", etc. As a surname, the modern Korean form of originally separate names derived from Chinese (chén), (Qín), (zhēn), as well as 晉 above.

 
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Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. (historical) An ancient state or tribal confederation in northern Korea.
  2. (historical) Synonym of Balhae, a northern Korean state, (particularly) between its AD 698 founding and 712 renaming.
  3. A Korean surname.
Derived terms edit

Etymology 7 edit

From Japanese (Jin, literally benevolence).

Proper noun edit

Jin

  1. A Japanese male given name.

Anagrams edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

Jin

  1. Rōmaji transcription of じん