See also: , , and ト゚
Japanese Katakana TO.png
U+30C8, ト
KATAKANA LETTER TO

[U+30C7]
Katakana
[U+30C9]
U+32E3, ㋣
CIRCLED KATAKANA TO

[U+32E2]
Enclosed CJK Letters and Months
[U+32E4]
U+FF84, ト
HALFWIDTH KATAKANA LETTER TO

[U+FF83]
Halfwidth and Fullwidth Forms
[U+FF85]

AinuEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly related to Nivkh ту (tu, lake).[1]

NounEdit

(Latin spelling to)

  1. lake
  2. puddle of water

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

(Latin spelling to)

  1. breast
  2. nipple

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

(Latin spelling to)

  1. day

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Vovin, Alexander V. (2016), “On the Linguistic Prehistory of Hokkaidō”, in Gruzdeva Ekaterina; Janhunen Juha, editors, Crosslinguistics and Linguistic Crossings in Northeast Asia. Papers on the Languages of Sakhalin and Adjacent Regions (Studia Orientalia; 117), Helsinki, pages 29–38.

Further readingEdit

  • John Batchelor (1905) An Ainu-English-Japanese dictionary (including a grammar of the Ainu language)[1], Tokyo; London: Methodist Publishing House; Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner Co., page 447

JapaneseEdit

Stroke order
 

Etymology 1Edit

Simplified in the Heian period from the man'yōgana kanji .

PronunciationEdit

SyllableEdit

(romaji to)

  1. The katakana syllable (to). Its equivalent in hiragana is (to). It is the twentieth syllable in the gojūon order; its position is (ta-gyō o-dan, row ta, section o).
Usage notesEdit

Unlike the hiragana system, used for Japanese language words that kanji does not cover, the katakana syllabary is used primarily for transcription of foreign language words into Japanese and the writing of loan words (collectively gairaigo), as well as to represent onomatopoeias, technical and scientific terms, and the names of plants, animals, and minerals. It is also occasionally used colloquially in some words for emphasis. Names of Japanese companies, as well as certain Japanese language words, are also sometimes written in katakana rather than the other systems. Formerly, female given names were written in katakana. [edit]

Derived charactersEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja

NounEdit

(to

  1. sol (musical note)