English

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English sol (fifth degree or note of Guido of Arezzo’s hexachordal scales),[1] the first syllable of Latin solve (to remove; to get rid of), the first word of the fifth line, third verse (“Solve polluti, labii reatum”, that is, “Clean the guilt from our stained lips”) of the famed medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, which solfège was based on because its lines started on each note of the scale successively.[2]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (uncountable)

  1. (music)
    1. In a movable-do or tonic sol-fa system: the fifth step in a scale, preceded by fa and followed by la.
      • c. 1590–1592 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Taming of the Shrew”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act III, scene i], page 218, column 2:
        D ſol re, one Cliffe, two notes haue I, / Ela mi, ſhow pitty or I die.
      • [c. 1591–1595 (date written), [William Shakespeare], [] Romeo and Juliet. [] (First Quarto), London: [] Iohn Danter, published 1597, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene v]:
        Ser[vant, i.e., Peter]. Alack alack what ſhal I doe, come Fidlers play me ſome mery dumpe. / I. [First musician]. A ſir, this is no time to play. / [] / Ser. Then will I giue it you, and ſoundly to. / I. What will you giue vs? / Ser. The fidler, Ile re you, Ile fa you, Ile ſol you. / I. If you re vs and fa vs, we will note you.
        A nonce use as a verb.]
    2. In a fixed-do system: the musical note G.
Alternative forms
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Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Old French sol (French coin) (modern French sou), from Latin solidum, the accusative singular of solidus (Roman gold coin; (adjective) solid),[3] ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *solh₂- (whole). Doublet of sold, soldo, solidum, and sou.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (plural sols)

  1. (historical) An old coin from France and some other countries worth 12 deniers.
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Translations
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Etymology 3

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PIE word
*sóh₂wl̥

From Spanish sol (sun),[4] from Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥ (sun). Doublet of Sol and sol, directly from the Latin.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (plural sols or soles)

  1. (historical) A former Spanish-American silver coin.
    • 1763, [Antoine-Simon] Le Page du Pratz, “Of the Commerce that Is, and May Be, Carried Out in Louisiana. []”, in [anonymous], transl., The History of Louisiana, or of the Western Parts of Virginia and Carolina: [], volume I, London: [] T. Becket and P. A. De Hondt [], →OCLC, page 336:
      The Tobacco of this colony is ſo excellent, that if the commerce thereof was free, it would ſell for one hundred ſols and ſix livres the pound, ſo fine and delicate is its juice and flavour.
  2. In full nuevo sol or new sol: the main currency unit of Peru which replaced the inti in 1991; also, a coin of this value.
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Translations
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Etymology 4

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From Latin sōl (sun);[5] see further at etymology 3. Doublet of sol from Spanish.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (plural sols)

  1. (astronomy) A solar day on the planet Mars (equivalent to 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds).
    • 2011, Andy Weir, chapter 3, in The Martian, New York, N.Y.: Broadway Books, published 2014, →ISBN, page 18:
      I need to create calories. And I need enough to last the 1387 sols until Ares 4 arrives. If I don't get rescued by Ares 4, I'm dead anyway. A sol is 39 minutes longer than a day, so it works out to be 1425 days. That's my target: 1425 days of food.
    • 2014, Gerard ’t Hooft, Stefan Vandoren, “10⁵ Seconds = 100,000 Seconds = 1.16 days = 27.78 Hours”, in Saskia A. Eisberg-’t Hooft, transl., Time in Powers of Ten: Natural Phenomena and Their Timescales, Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co., →ISBN, part I, page 25:
      88,775 seconds = 24 hours, 39 minutes and 35 seconds / The duration of a synodic day on Mars, a ‘sol
Derived terms
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Translations
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Etymology 5

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Sense 1 (“type of colloid”) is derived from -sol (in words like alcosol and hydrosol), an abbreviation of solution.[6]

Sense 2 (“solution to an objection”) is derived directly from solution.[7]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (plural sols)

  1. (physical chemistry) A type of colloid in which a solid is dispersed in a liquid.
  2. (obsolete) A solution to an objection (or "ob"), for example, in controversial divinity.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “Symptomes Generall, Loue to Their Owne Sect, Hate of All Other Religions, []”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, →OCLC, partition 3, section 4, member 1, subsection 3, page 524:
      [F]or that they had nothing elſe to doe, [] haue coyned a thouſand idle queſtions, nice diſtinctions, Obs and Sols, []
    • [1678, [Samuel Butler], “[The Third Part of Hudibras]”, in Hudibras. The Third and Last Part, London: [] Simon Miller, [], →OCLC, canto II, page 165:
      Where Hinderſon, and th' other Maſſes / Were ſent to Cap Texts, and Put Caſes: / To paſs for deep, and Learned Scholars, / Although but Paltry, Ob-and-Sollers: []]
Derived terms
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Translations
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References

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  1. ^ sol, n.(2)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare sol, n.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020; sol1, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  3. ^ sol, n.3”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020.
  4. ^ sol, n.5”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, June 2018; sol3, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  5. ^ sol, n.7”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2018.
  6. ^ sol, n.6”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, September 2018; sol2, n.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–2022.
  7. ^ † sol, n.4”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021.

Anagrams

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Asturian

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Etymology

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From a contraction of the preposition so (under) + masculine singular article el (the).

Contraction

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sol m

  1. under the

Azerbaijani

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Other scripts
Cyrillic сол
Abjad سوُل

Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *sōl.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (definite accusative solu, plural sollar)

  1. left
    küçənin sol tərəfileft side of the street

Declension

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    Declension of sol
singular plural
nominative sol
sollar
definite accusative solu
solları
dative sola
sollara
locative solda
sollarda
ablative soldan
sollardan
definite genitive solun
solların
    Possessive forms of sol
nominative
singular plural
mənim (my) solum sollarım
sənin (your) solun solların
onun (his/her/its) solu solları
bizim (our) solumuz sollarımız
sizin (your) solunuz sollarınız
onların (their) solu or solları solları
accusative
singular plural
mənim (my) solumu sollarımı
sənin (your) solunu sollarını
onun (his/her/its) solunu sollarını
bizim (our) solumuzu sollarımızı
sizin (your) solunuzu sollarınızı
onların (their) solunu or sollarını sollarını
dative
singular plural
mənim (my) soluma sollarıma
sənin (your) soluna sollarına
onun (his/her/its) soluna sollarına
bizim (our) solumuza sollarımıza
sizin (your) solunuza sollarınıza
onların (their) soluna or sollarına sollarına
locative
singular plural
mənim (my) solumda sollarımda
sənin (your) solunda sollarında
onun (his/her/its) solunda sollarında
bizim (our) solumuzda sollarımızda
sizin (your) solunuzda sollarınızda
onların (their) solunda or sollarında sollarında
ablative
singular plural
mənim (my) solumdan sollarımdan
sənin (your) solundan sollarından
onun (his/her/its) solundan sollarından
bizim (our) solumuzdan sollarımızdan
sizin (your) solunuzdan sollarınızdan
onların (their) solundan or sollarından sollarından
genitive
singular plural
mənim (my) solumun sollarımın
sənin (your) solunun sollarının
onun (his/her/its) solunun sollarının
bizim (our) solumuzun sollarımızın
sizin (your) solunuzun sollarınızın
onların (their) solunun or sollarının sollarının

Antonyms

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Derived terms

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Bislama

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Etymology

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From English salt. Cognate with Tok Pisin sol.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈsol/
  • Hyphenation: sol

Noun

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sol

  1. salt

Derived terms

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References

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  • Terry Crowley (2004) Bislama Reference Grammar, Honolulu: University of Hawaiʻi press, →ISBN, page 17

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Catalan sol, from Latin sōlem (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Proper noun

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sol m

  1. (astronomy) the Sun (the center of our solar system)

Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. (astronomy) sun
  2. (numismatics) sol (a unit of currency used in Peru)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. (music) sol (the fifth note of the diatonic scale)

Etymology 3

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Borrowed from English sol.

Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Etymology 4

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Inherited from Latin sōlus (solitary).

Adjective

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sol (feminine sola, masculine plural sols, feminine plural soles)

  1. alone (by oneself, solitary)
    • 2020 March 12, María José Gómez, Time Out Barcelona[1], volume 588, page 8, column Fight!:
      M'encanta viure en parella, sortir en grup, treballar en equip. Però també m'agrada estar sola.
      I love living as a couple, going out in a group, working on a team. But I also like being alone.
  2. unique
Derived terms
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Etymology 5

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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sol

  1. third-person singular present indicative of soler

References

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Chavacano

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Etymology

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Inherited from Spanish sol (sun).

Noun

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sol

  1. sun

Crimean Tatar

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Noun

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sol (accusative [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. left

Declension

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Adjective

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sol

  1. left

References

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  • Mirjejev, V. A., Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[2], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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sol

  1. second-person singular imperative of solit

Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology 1

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From Old Norse sól, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol c (singular definite solen, plural indefinite sole)

  1. sun
Inflection
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Verb

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sol

  1. imperative of sole

Etymology 2

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From Latin solūtiō (solution).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol c (singular definite solen, plural indefinite soler)

  1. (chemistry) sol (solution)
Inflection
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Etymology 3

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From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol n (singular definite sollet, plural indefinite soller)

  1. (music) sol (note)
Inflection
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Further reading

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Dutch

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Etymology

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From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist all note names were taken from.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol f (plural sollen, diminutive solletje n)

  1. (music, Belgium) sol (the fifth step in the solfège scale of C, preceded by fa and followed by la)

Derived terms

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Anagrams

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Franco-Provençal

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin sōlus.

Adjective

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sol (feminine sola, masculine plural sols, feminine plural soles) (ORB large)

  1. alone

Notes

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In many areas replaced with its own derivative solèt.

Derived terms

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References

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  • seul in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca
  • sol in Lo trèsor Arpitan – on arpitan.eu

Further information

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French

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Etymology 1

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From Latin solum (soil, ground, floor).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. soil, earth
  2. ground
  3. floor
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Latin sol(ve) in the hymn for St. John the Baptist where all note names were taken from.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural sol)

  1. (music) sol (the fifth step (G) in the solfège scale of C, preceded by fa and followed by la)
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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From Spanish sol (sun), itself from Latin sol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. a Spanish-American gold or silver coin, now the main currency unit of Peru (also new sol), or a coin of this value

Etymology 4

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From Latin solidus, a Roman coin. This form kept the historical spelling based on the Old French and Latin. See the main entry at sou.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural sols)

  1. (archaic) sou (the feudal era coin)

Further reading

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Galician

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese sol, from Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural soles)

  1. sun
  2. sunlight
  3. sunny side (of a place)
    quítate do solgo away from sunny side
  4. daylight (the time between sunrise and sunset)
Antonyms
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  • (antonym(s) of sunlight): sombra
  • (antonym(s) of sunny side): sombra
  • (antonym(s) of daylight): noite
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural soles)

  1. (music) sol (a musical note)
  2. (music) G (the musical note or key)

See also

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Etymology 3

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From English sol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (plural soles)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

References

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Guinea-Bissau Creole

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Etymology

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From Portuguese sol. Cognate with Kabuverdianu sol.

Noun

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sol

  1. sun

Hausa

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Pronunciation

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Ideophone

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sol

  1. very white
    Synonym: fat

Indonesian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈsɔl]
  • Hyphenation: sol

Etymology 1

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From Dutch zool, from Middle Dutch sole, from Vulgar Latin sola ("bottom of the shoe", also "flatfish"), from Latin solea (sandal, bottom of the shoe), from Proto-Indo-European *swol- (sole). Compare to Afrikaans sool.

Noun

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sol (first-person possessive solku, second-person possessive solmu, third-person possessive solnya)

  1. sole (the bottom of a shoe or boot)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Dutch sol, the first syllable of Latin solve (to remove, get rid of), the first word of the fifth line, third verse (“Solve polluti, labii reatum”, that is, “Clean the guilt from our stained lips”) of the famed medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, which solfège was based on because its lines started on each note of the scale successively.

Noun

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sol (first-person possessive solku, second-person possessive solmu, third-person possessive solnya)

  1. (music) sol:
    1. in a movable-do or tonic sol-fa system: the fifth step in a scale, preceded by fa and followed by la.
    2. in a fixed-do system: the musical note G.

Further reading

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Interlingua

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Noun

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sol (plural soles)

  1. sun

Adjective

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sol (comparative plus sol, superlative le plus sol)

  1. alone

Determiner

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sol

  1. (quantifying) only

Derived terms

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Italian

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Etymology 1

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Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

From the first syllable of Latin solve, from the medieval hymn Ut queant laxis, from which the names of the notes were derived.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (uncountable)

  1. sol (a musical note)
  2. G (the musical note and key)

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from English sol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (uncountable)

  1. sol (a type of colloid)

Etymology 3

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Borrowed from Spanish sol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (uncountable)

  1. sol (a currency of Peru)
  2. (historical) sol (a former Spanish-American silver coin)

Etymology 4

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈsol/
  • Rhymes: -ol
  • Hyphenation: sól

Noun

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sol m (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of sole

Etymology 5

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈsol/
  • Rhymes: -ol
  • Hyphenation: sól

Adjective

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sol (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of solo

Adverb

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sol (apocopated)

  1. Apocopic form of solo

Further reading

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  • sol1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • sol2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana
  • sol in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

Kabuverdianu

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Etymology

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From Portuguese sol.

Verb

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sol

  1. sun

Ladino

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Noun

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sol m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling סול)

  1. sun

Latin

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Latin Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia la
 
Sol oriens.

Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Italic *s(u)wōl, from Proto-Indo-European *suh₂ṓl (*suh₂ól-s) ~ *suh₂l-és m (the sun), rebuilt s-stem from *súh₂el ~ *suh₂éns n (whence Sanskrit स्वर् (svar, the sun)), leveled from *sóh₂wl̥ ~ *suh₂éns (from *sh₂wéns via laryngeal metathesis).[1] Alternatively from Proto-Italic *saul through an irregular change conditioned by -l, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ul.[2]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sōl m (genitive sōlis); third declension

  1. (astronomy, often capitalized) the Sun
  2. (astronomy) a sun
  3. (alchemy, chemistry) gold
  4. (figurative, in the plural) days, period of one's life
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 5.4–6:
      Soles occidere et redire possunt / nobis cum semel occidit brevis lux / nox est perpetua una dormienda
      Suns can set and rise again / but once this brief light ends / there is endless night for us to sleep.
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 8.3–5:
      Fulsere quondam candidi tibi soles / cum ventitabas quo puella ducebat / amata nobis quantum amabitur nulla.
      Once shined for you beautiful suns / when you went where the girl led you / loved by us like no other [girl].
  5. (mythology) See Sōl.

Declension

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Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sōl sōlēs
Genitive sōlis sōlum
Dative sōlī sōlibus
Accusative sōlem sōlēs
Ablative sōle sōlibus
Vocative sōl sōlēs

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Balkan Romance:
    • Aromanian: soari
    • Istro-Romanian: sore
    • Megleno-Romanian: soari
    • Romanian: soare
  • Dalmatian: Dalmatian: saul
  • Italo-Romance:
  • Insular Romance:
  • North Italian:
  • Gallo-Romance:
    • Catalan: sol
    • Franco-Provençal: sol
    • Old Gascon:
    • Old Occitan: sol
      • Occitan: sol (Florac, Lastic, Creuse)
  • Ibero-Romance:
    • Aragonese: sol
    • Mozarabic: שול (šwl)
    • Old Leonese: [Term?]
    • Old Galician-Portuguese: sol
      • Fala: sol
      • Galician: sol
      • Portuguese: Sol (see there for further descendants)
    • Spanish: sol
  • Vulgar Latin: *sōliculum (see there for further descendants)
  • Borrowings:
    • Proto-Brythonic: [Term?]

References

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  1. ^ Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN, § 88.3c, page 84:*suHel
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008) “sōl, sōlis”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 570

Further reading

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  • "sol", in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • "sol", in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sol in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • sol in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette.

Lombard

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Etymology

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From Latin sōl.

Noun

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sol

  1. sun

Lower Sorbian

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sol

Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol f inan

  1. salt (sodium chloride)
  2. (chemistry) salt (a compound of an acid and a base)

Declension

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Derived terms

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Middle English

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Etymology

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From Latin sōl (sun), or perhaps from Old English sōl (sun), both of which hail from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun

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sol (uncountable)

  1. The brightest and warmest celestial body, considered to be a planet in the Ptolemic system; the Sun (the center of our solar system).
  2. (rare) A heavy, yellow metal; gold.

Synonyms

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References

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Northern Kurdish

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Noun

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sol f

  1. shoe

Norwegian Bokmål

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /suːl/
  • (Many eastern and northern dialects) IPA(key): [suːɽ]

Etymology 1

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From Old Norse sól, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Noun

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sol f or m (definite singular sola or solen, indefinite plural soler, definite plural solene)

  1. sun
    Solen skinner.
    The sun is shining.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Shortened form of Latin solūtiō

Noun

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sol m

  1. solution
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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Verb

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sol

  1. imperative of sole

References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology 1

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sola

From Old Norse sól, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /suːl/, [suːl]
  • (Many eastern and northern dialects) IPA(key): [suːɽ]

Noun

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sol f (definite singular sola, indefinite plural soler, definite plural solene)

  1. sun
    Sola skin i dag.
    The sun shines today.
  2. sunshine
    Det er sol ute.
    There is sunshine outside.
  3. a shiningly merry girl
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Latin solve, from the first word of the fifth line of Ut queant laxis, the medieval hymn on which solfège was based because its lines started on each note of the scale successively. Through Italian.

Alternative forms

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  • so (an open syllable variant)

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m (definite singular sol-en, indefinite plural sol-ar, definite plural sol-ane)

  1. (music) sol (a syllable used in solfège to represent the fifth note of a major scale)
Coordinate terms
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Etymology 3

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Shortened form of Latin solūtiō.

Noun

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sol m

  1. solution
Derived terms
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Etymology 4

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From Spanish sol (sun), from Latin sōl (sun), but also from Latin solidus. This makes it a doublet of sold, sou, solid, and solidus, as well as Norwegian sol f (sun) (Etymology 1).

Noun

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sol m (plural solen)

  1. sol; the main Peruvian currency since 1991
    • 2009 September 4, Dag og Tid, page 11:
      Det representerer investeringar på 4600 millionar soles [om lag 9 milliardar NOK], presiserer viseministeren.
      It represents investments of 4600 million sols [about 9 billion Norwegian kroner], says the vice minister.
  2. (historical) the Peruvian currency between 1863 and 1985
    • 1981, Gregorio Condori Mamani, translated by Svanaug Steinnes, Indianarliv i Peru, Oslo: Samlaget, page 48:
      Alt dette kosta åtte soles.
      It cost eight sols in total.

Etymology 5

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Noun

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sol n (definite singular solet, indefinite plural sol, definite plural sola)

  1. alternative spelling of sòl

References

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  • “sol” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • “sol”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016
  • “sol” in Ivar Aasen (1873) Norsk Ordbog med dansk Forklaring

Anagrams

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Old English

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-West Germanic *sōl, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sōl ?

  1. sun
  2. the Sun
Usage notes
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  • The exact gender is unknown. Based on cognates in related languages, it is speculated to be either feminine or neuter.
Synonyms
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Etymology 2

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From Proto-West Germanic *sol, from Proto-Germanic *sulą (mud, spot), from Proto-Indo-European *sūl- (thick liquid). Cognate with Old High German sol, gisol (pool of excrement), Middle Dutch sol (puddle, dirt, filth). More at soil.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol n

  1. mud, wet sand, mire
  2. wallowing-place, slough, miry-place
Declension
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Descendants
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Adjective

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sol

  1. dark, dirty, soiled
Declension
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Descendants
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Old French

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Latin sōlus.

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Adjective

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sol m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sole)

  1. alone
Derived terms
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Descendants
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Etymology 2

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Inherited from Latin solidus.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol oblique singularm (oblique plural sous or sox or sols, nominative singular sous or sox or sols, nominative plural sol)

  1. sol (an Old French coin)
Descendants
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Old Galician-Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Latin sōlus (alone).

Adverb

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sol

  1. only; just; no more than
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Latin sōl, sōlem (sun), from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥ (sun).

Noun

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sol m

  1. sun
    • Eſta primeira é de comel fez ó çeo. ⁊ á terra. ⁊ ó mar ⁊ o ſol. ⁊ á lũa. ⁊ as eſtrelas ⁊ todalas outras couſas q̇ ſon. ⁊ como fez ó ome áſa ſemellança
      This first one is (about) how He made the heaven, and the earth, and the sea, and the sun, and the moon, and the stars, and everything else that exists. And how (He) made man in His own likeness.
Descendants
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  • Fala: sol
  • Galician: sol
  • Portuguese: Sol (see there for further descendants)

Etymology 3

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Verb

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sol

  1. third-person singular present indicative of soer

Old Occitan

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Etymology

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From Latin sōl.

Proper noun

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sol m

  1. Sun (celestial object)
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References

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Old Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse sól, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Noun

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sōl f

  1. sun

Declension

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The template Template:gmq-osw-decl-noun-o-f does not use the parameter(s):
dat_sg=sōlu
Please see Module:checkparams for help with this warning.

Descendants

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Piedmontese

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Etymology

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From Latin sōl.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol m

  1. sun

Portuguese

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Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese sol, from Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥.

Noun

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sol m (plural sóis)

  1. sun (a star, especially when seen as the centre of any single solar system)
  2. sunshine (a location on which the sun's rays fall)
  3. (uncountable) weather (the state of the atmosphere at a specific time and place)
    O sol frio de inverno.
    Winter's cold weather.
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Guinea-Bissau Creole: sol
  • Kabuverdianu: sol
  • Papiamentu: sol

Etymology 2

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From Latin solve in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun

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sol m (plural sóis)

  1. sol (a musical note)

Etymology 3

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From English sol.

Noun

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sol m (plural sóis)

  1. (chemistry, physics) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Further reading

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  • sol” in Dicionário Aberto based on Novo Diccionário da Língua Portuguesa de Cândido de Figueiredo, 1913

Romanian

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Etymology 1

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From Latin solum (base, bottom; soil), French sol.

Noun

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sol n (plural soluri)

  1. the lowest part of something; bottom, ground, base, foundation, bed
  2. the floor or pavement of a room
  3. ground, earth, land, soil
  4. (gymnastics) an event performed on a floor-like carpeted surface
Declension
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Etymology 2

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From Proto-Slavic *sъlъ, compare Slovene sel.

Noun

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sol m (plural soli)

  1. messenger
  2. envoy
Declension
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Further reading

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Serbo-Croatian

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Alternative forms

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  • (Bosnian, Serbian):

Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls. Compare Solyanka.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sȏl f (Cyrillic spelling со̑л)

  1. (Croatia) salt

Declension

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Slovene

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Slovene Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sl

Etymology

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From Proto-Slavic *solь, from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂l-, *séh₂ls.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sọ̑ł f

  1. salt (a common substance)

Inflection

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The diacritics used in this section of the entry are non-tonal. If you are a native tonal speaker, please help by adding the tonal marks.
Feminine, i-stem, long mixed accent
nom. sing. sól
gen. sing. solí
singular dual plural
nominative
(imenovȃlnik)
sól solí solí
genitive
(rodȋlnik)
solí solí solí
dative
(dajȃlnik)
sóli soléma solém
accusative
(tožȋlnik)
sól solí solí
locative
(mẹ̑stnik)
sóli soléh soléh
instrumental
(orọ̑dnik)
soljó soléma solmí

Further reading

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  • sol”, in Slovarji Inštituta za slovenski jezik Frana Ramovša ZRC SAZU, portal Fran
  • sol”, in Termania, Amebis
  • See also the general references

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Latin sōl (sun), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *sóh₂wl̥. The Peruvian currency makes reference to the meaning "sun", but is a shortening from Latin solidus.

Noun

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sol m (plural soles)

  1. sun
  2. sunlight
  3. sunny side (of a place)
    Antonym: sombra
    quítate del solget out of the sun
  4. daylight (the time between sunrise and sunset)
    Antonym: noche
  5. sol (a unit of currency, currently used in Peru)
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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From Latin solve in the hymn for St. John the Baptist.

Noun

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sol m (uncountable)

  1. sol (a musical note)

Etymology 3

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Borrowed from English sol.

Noun

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sol m (plural soles)

  1. (chemistry) sol (a colloid suspension of a solid in a liquid)

Further reading

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Anagrams

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Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Swedish sōl, from Old Norse sól, from Proto-Germanic *sōl (sun).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol c

  1. sun
  2. (by extension): A star, especially when one considers things in its surroundings.

Declension

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Declension of sol 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative sol solen solar solarna
Genitive sols solens solars solarnas

Derived terms

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References

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Anagrams

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Talysh

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Etymology

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Cognate with Persian سال (sāl).

Noun

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sol

  1. year

Tok Pisin

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Etymology 1

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From English shoulder.

Noun

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sol

  1. (anatomy) shoulder

Etymology 2

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From English salt.

Noun

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sol

  1. salt
Derived terms
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  • solwara (sea, ocean; saltwater, brine)

Turkish

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Etymology 1

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From Ottoman Turkish صول (sol, left), from Proto-Turkic *sōl.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (definite accusative solu, plural sollar)

  1. left
Antonyms
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Etymology 2

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Verb

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sol

  1. second-person singular imperative of solmak

Etymology 3

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From French sol.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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sol (definite accusative solü, plural soller)

  1. (music) sol

Veps

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Etymology

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From Proto-Finnic *soola.

Noun

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sol

  1. salt

Declension

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Inflection of sol (inflection type 6/kuva)
nominative sing. sol
genitive sing. solan
partitive sing. solad
partitive plur.
singular plural
nominative sol
accusative solan
genitive solan
partitive solad
essive-instructive solan
translative solaks
inessive solas
elative solaspäi
illative solaha
solha
adessive solal
ablative solalpäi
allative solale
abessive solata
comitative solanke
prolative soladme
approximative I solanno
approximative II solannoks
egressive solannopäi
terminative I solahasai
solhasai
terminative II solalesai
terminative III solassai
additive I solahapäi
solhapäi
additive II solalepäi

Volapük

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Noun

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sol (nominative plural sols)

  1. sun

Declension

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Zazaki

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Etymology

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Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *séh₂ls (salt).

Noun

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sol

  1. salt