See also: herz and hèrz

Bavarian edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German herze, from Old High German herza. Cognate with German Herz.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

Herz n (plural Herzen or Herzn)

  1. heart
  2. (card games) hearts

Inflection edit

See also edit

German suits in Bavarian · 's Deitsche Blatt (layout · text)
       
Herz Schelln Groos Oachl

Czech edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation edit

Proper noun edit

Herz m anim (feminine Herzová)

  1. a male surname

Declension edit

This proper noun needs an inflection-table template.

German edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German herze, from Old High German herza, from Proto-West Germanic *hertā, from Proto-Germanic *hertô (heart), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱḗr (heart).

Cognate with Dutch hart, English heart, Danish hjerte, Gothic 𐌷𐌰𐌹𐍂𐍄𐍉 (hairtō).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /hɛrts/, [hɛʁt͡s], [hɛɐ̯t͡s]
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Homophone: Hertz

Noun edit

Herz n (weak, genitive Herzens or (very rare) Herzes, plural Herzen, diminutive Herzchen n or Herzlein n or ((also) Ruhrpöttisch) Herzken n)

  1. heart
  2. (card games) hearts
  3. sweetheart, darling

Usage notes edit

  • Herz has irregular singular declension and is the only noun of its kind.
  • The genitive singular takes the ending -ens: des Herzens. The form des Herzes is very rare and generally considered nonstandard.
  • The dative singular traditionally takes -en: dem Herzen. This form is still the only accepted standard form in many—more or less fixed—expressions, such as im Herzen, von Herzen, zu Herzen, Operation am offenen Herzen (open-heart surgery), mit halbem Herzen (half-heartedly), and others.
Only the bare form dem Herz is common when referring to a card suit, as a term of endearment, and in the phrase mit Herz (good-hearted)
Otherwise, the forms dem Herzen and dem Herz are both acceptable. The latter is predominant in speech, while the former remains the more established form in writing.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Macedonian: херц m (herc)
  • Serbo-Croatian:
    Cyrillic script: хе̏рц m
    Latin script: hȅrc m

See also edit

Suits in German · Farbe (layout · text)
       
Herz Karo Pik, Schippe Kreuz, Treff
German suits in German · das Deutsche Blatt (layout · text)
       
Herz, Rot Schellen Laub, Grün Eichel, Eckern

Further reading edit

  • Herz” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache
  • Herz” in Uni Leipzig: Wortschatz-Lexikon
  • Herz” in Duden online
  • Herz” in OpenThesaurus.de
  •   Herz on the German Wikipedia.Wikipedia de

Hunsrik edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Central Franconian Hätz, from Middle High German herze, from Old High German herza.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

Herz n (plural Herze, diminutive Herzje)

  1. heart
    Mein Herz dud weh.
    My heart hurts.

Further reading edit