gracious

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English gracious, from Old French gracieus, from Latin gratiosus, from gratia (esteem, favor). See grace. Displaced native Old English hold (gracious). Doublet of gracioso and grazioso.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɹeɪʃəs/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃəs

AdjectiveEdit

gracious (comparative more gracious, superlative most gracious)

  1. kind and warmly courteous
  2. tactful
  3. compassionate
  4. indulgent, charming and graceful
  5. elegant and with good taste
  6. benignant
  7. full of grace
  8. magnanimous, without arrogance or complaint, benevolently declining to raise controversy or insist on possible prerogatives.
    The actress's gracious acceptance of being named only in the end credits allowed her character's appearance in the episode to remain a surprise.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See alsoEdit

InterjectionEdit

gracious

  1. Expression of surprise, contempt, outrage, disgust, boredom, or frustration.

SynonymsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French gracious, from Latin grātiōsus. Equivalent to grace +‎ -ous.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡraːsiˈuːs/, /ɡraːˈsjuːs/, /ˈɡraːsius/, /ˈɡraːsjus/, /ˈɡraːsjəs/

AdjectiveEdit

gracious (plural and weak singular graciouse, comparative graciouser, superlative graciousest)

  1. kind, gracious, polite
  2. forgiving, relenting (used mainly positively)
  3. godly, Christian, involving the graciousness of God.
  4. lucky, glad; bestowed with good fortune.
  5. enjoyable, nice, pleasing.
  6. good-looking; pleasing to the eye.
  7. obedient, respectworthy
  8. (rare) useful, beneficious

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: gracious
  • Scots: gracious
  • Yola: graacuse, graashoos

ReferencesEdit