a priori

See also: apriori

EnglishEdit

 a priori on Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1610, from Latin ā priōrī (literally from the former).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (anglicized) /ˌeɪ pɹaɪˈɔːɹaɪ/, (Latinist) /ˌɑː pɹiˈɔːɹi/
    • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (comparative more a priori, superlative most a priori)

  1. (logic) Based on hypothesis and theory rather than experiment or empirical evidence.
    In his opening argument, the student mentioned nothing beyond his a priori knowledge.
  2. Self-evident, intuitively obvious.
  3. Presumed without analysis.
    • 1996, Jeet Heer, Gravitas, Autumn 1996
      While the great critics drew their authority from the breadth of their reading, New Criterion critics often base their authority on an a priori rejection of the contemporary.
  4. (linguistics, conlanging) Developed entirely from scratch, without deriving it from existing languages.[1]
    • 2012 November 1, Wright, Laura, “UT Language Creation Society invites students to learn origins of newer languages”, in The Daily Texan[1]:
      Conlangers can also create a priori languages, which have no basis in existing languages. You might be familiar with more a priori conlangs than you think: The Klingon language from the television series “Star Trek,” the Na’vi language from the movie “Avatar,” and the Dothraki language from the television series “Game of Thrones” are all examples of a priori languages.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori (comparative more a priori, superlative most a priori)

  1. (logic) In a way based on theoretical deduction rather than empirical observation.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Donald J. Harlow, How to Build a Language

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin a priori (literally from the former).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (invariable)

  1. intuitively known, a priori

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. (informal) at first glance

NounEdit

a priori m (plural a prioris)

  1. a preconceived idea

AntonymsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin a priori (literally from the former).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (not comparable)

  1. a priori

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. a priori

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

From Latin a priori (literally from the former).

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (invariable)

  1. a priori

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. a priori
    Antonym: a posteriori

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Medieval Latin ā priōrī (literally from the former), first part from Latin ā (from, away from, out of), alternative form of ab (from, away from, out of, down from) by apocope (not used before a vowel or h), from Proto-Italic *ab, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (off, away). Last part from Latin priōrī, dative singular of Medieval Latin prior (former, prior, previous), from Proto-Italic *priōs (former), from earlier *prijōs, from *pri + *-jōs, from Proto-Indo-European *-yōs ~ *-is-.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. (logic, philosophy) a priori; based on hypothesis rather than experiment.
    • 2011 December 23, Morgenbladet, page 9:
      førmoderne samfunn … hvor forskjell ennå ikke betraktes a priori som en mangel
      pre-modern societies… where difference is not yet considered a priori as a deficiency
    viten a priori
    a priori knowledge
  2. presumed without analysis, self-evident, intuitively obvious.
    • 1894, Dagbladet:
      adskillige snes ungdom, som a priori kan henregnes til det overflødige proletariat
      several dozen youth, who a priori can be attributed to the superfluous proletariat
    • 1971, Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift:
      to former for apriori innsikt
      two forms of a priori insight
    • 2004, Thea Selliaas Thorsen, Pia Fraus:
      han [vil] ikke a priori utelukke at [sjalusien] kan være noe av årsaken til at han nå drives rundt av en uro
      he [will] not a priori rule out that [jealousy] may be part of the reason why he is now driven around by a turmoil
    a priori kunne man vente at...
    a priori one could expect that...

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. (logic, philosophy) a priori; based on hypothesis rather than experiment.
  2. presumed without analysis, self-evident, intuitively obvious.

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin a priori (literally from the former).

AdverbEdit

a priori (comparative mais a priori superlative o mais a priori)

  1. (logic) a priori (derived by logic)

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

 
Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From Latin a priori (literally from the former).

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. beforehand
  2. (logic, philosophy) a priori

Derived termsEdit