See also: Prior and prior to

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin prior, comparative of Old Latin *pri (before), from Proto-Indo-European *per- (beyond), *pro (before). Parallel to English former, as comparative form from same Proto-Indo-European root, whence also fore (thence before).

AdjectiveEdit

prior (not comparable)

  1. Advance; previous; coming before.
    I had no prior knowledge you were coming.
  2. Former, previous.
    His prior residence was smaller than his current one.
Usage notesEdit
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

prior (comparative more prior, superlative most prior)

  1. (colloquial) Previously.
    Synonyms: ago, hitherto
    The doctor had known three months prior.
    • 2019 April 14, Alex McLevy, “Winter is Here on Game of Thrones’ Final Season Premiere (Newbies)”, in The A.V. Club[1], archived from the original on 18 December 2020:
      From the opening shots of the anonymous young Winterfell boy rushing to catch a glimpse of Jon Snow and Queen Daenerys Targaryen, hearkening back to those moments of the very first episode in which Arya rushed to do the same with an approaching King Robert Baratheon, the series is calling back to its beginning, suggesting (at least for now) that the wheel continues to turn, sending us back into a pattern begun seven seasons prior.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

prior (plural priors)

  1. (US, law enforcement) A previous arrest or criminal conviction on someone's record. [from 19th c.]
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, p. 53:
      ‘And a little later we get the routine report on his prints from Washington, and he's got a prior back in Indiana, attempted hold-up six years ago.’
  2. (statistics, Bayesian inference) A prior probability distribution, one based on information or belief before additional data is collected. [from 20th c.]
Coordinate termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English priour, prior, from Old English prior, Old French prior, and their etymon Latin prior.

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

prior (plural priors)

  1. A high-ranking member of a monastery, usually lower in rank than an abbot.
  2. (historical) A chief magistrate in Italy.
SynonymsEdit
  • (second-in-command to an abbot): provost
Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prior.

NounEdit

prior m (plural priors, feminine priora)

  1. prior (a high-ranking member of a monastery)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *priōs, from earlier *prijōs, from *pri + *-jōs, thus the comparative degree of Old Latin *pri (before), from Proto-Italic *pri from Proto-Indo-European *per- (beyond), *pro (before).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prior (neuter prius, superlative prīmus); third-declension comparative adjective

  1. former, prior, previous (preceding in time)
    priore annothe year before, the previous year; during the year before
    priore aestatethe previous summer
    priore noctethe previous night
    • 27 BCE – 25 BCE, Titus Livius, Ab urbe condita libri 26.1:
      Q. Fuluio Ap. Claudio, prioris anni consulibus, prorogatum imperium est atque exercitus quos habebant decreti, adiectumque ne a Capua quam obsidebant abscederent priusquam expugnassent.
      The military authority of Quintus Fulvius and Appius Claudius, consuls of the previous year, was extended and the armies which they had were decided upon, and it was added as a proviso that they should not withdraw from Capua, which they were besieging, until they conquered it.
  2. the first, the original
  3. in front
  4. (figuratively) better, superior
  5. (substantive, Medieval Latin) abbot, prior

Usage notesEdit

  • This adjective has no positive form; rather, it serves as the comparative (prior) and superlative (prīmus) of the preposition prae. (Compare the preposition post, with comparative posterior and superlative postremus).

DeclensionEdit

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masc./Fem. Neuter Masc./Fem. Neuter
Nominative prior prius priōrēs priōra
Genitive priōris priōrum
Dative priōrī priōribus
Accusative priōrem prius priōrēs priōra
Ablative priōre priōribus
Vocative prior prius priōrēs priōra

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • prior in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • prior in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • prior in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • prior in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[2], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • last year: superiore, priore anno
    • (ambiguous) there is nothing I am more interested in than..: nihil antiquius or prius habeo quam ut (nihil mihi antiquius or potius est, quam ut)

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prior.

NounEdit

prior m (plural priores, feminine priora, feminine plural prioras)

  1. prior (a high-ranking member of a monastery)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit