ambulant

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin ambulans, present participle of ambulare (to walk).

AdjectiveEdit

ambulant (not comparable)

  1. Able to walk.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      They are crossing the carpark with difficulty for Rick is holding Pym's arm in an ambulant bearhug and they are advancing at an angle like a pair of crookedly hung overcoats.
  2. Designed for use by somebody with a disability that impairs, but does not prevent, walking.
    an ambulant toilet

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ambulant (plural ambulants)

  1. A patient who is able to walk.

Further readingEdit


CatalanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ambulant (masculine and feminine plural ambulants)

  1. travelling; itinerant (having no fixed location)
  2. ambulant; walking; able to walk

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ambulāns, ambulantem, present participle of ambulō (I walk).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ambulant (feminine singular ambulante, masculine plural ambulants, feminine plural ambulantes)

  1. walking, strolling

VerbEdit

ambulant

  1. present participle of ambuler

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ambuˈlant/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ant
  • Hyphenation: am‧bu‧lant

AdjectiveEdit

ambulant (not comparable)

  1. ambulant; outpatient (attributive noun)

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

ambulant

  1. third-person plural present active indicative of ambulō

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French ambulant, from Latin ambulans.

AdjectiveEdit

ambulant m or n (feminine singular ambulantă, masculine plural ambulanți, feminine and neuter plural ambulante)

  1. peripatetic

DeclensionEdit