See also: Blower

English

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Etymology

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From Middle English blowere, blower, from Old English blāwere; equivalent to blow +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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blower (plural blowers)

  1. A person who blows.
    Hyponyms: glassblower, whistleblower
  2. (mining) A fissure from which firedamp issues, often in quantity for many years.
    • 1843, Humphry Davy, “On the fire-damp of coal mines, and on methods of lighting the mines so as to prevent its explosion”, in Proceedings of the Royal Society of London[1], number 31 December 1833 volume 2, republished online 1 January 1997:
      The great sources of fire-damp in coal mines are blowers or fissures from which currents of this inflammable gas issue in considerable quantities and for a long series of years
  3. Any device that blows; often, especially, a furnace component or a supercharger.
    Hyponyms: bubble blower, dry blower, leaf blower, party blower, snow blower, soot blower, tear blower
    • 1942 July–August, Philip Spencer, “On the Footplate in Egypt”, in Railway Magazine, page 208:
      The locomotive [] was quietly "blowing off" on one Ross "pop" valve, whilst the rhythmic clanging of the fireman's shovel, the black smoke pouring from her chimney, and the harsh sound of the blower told of the proximity of departure time.
    1. A ducted fan, usually part of a heating, ventilation, and/or air conditioning system.
  4. (slang, chiefly British, New Zealand, Australia, Ireland, usually preceded by the) Telephone.
    Get on the blower and call headquarters right away!
    1. (slang, UK, Ireland, historical) A telephone service providing betting odds and commentary, relayed to customers in a bookmaker's shop via loudspeaker.
  5. (dated) A braggart, or loud talker.
    • 1999, John Harmon McElroy, editor, The Sacrificial Years: A Chronicle of Walt Whitman's Experiences in the Civil War, page 29:
      There hangs something majestic about a man who has borne his part in battles, especially if he is very quiet regarding it when you desire him to unbosom. I am continually lost at the absence of blowing and blowers among these old-young American militaires.
  6. (nautical) The whale; so called from its habit of spouting up a column of water.
  7. A small fish of the Atlantic coast, Sphoeroides maculatus; the puffer.
  8. (Philippines) An electric fan.

Derived terms

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  • (equipment blowing air to fire): blowpipe

Translations

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Anagrams

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Indonesian

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Etymology

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From English blower.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈblowər]
  • Hyphenation: blo‧wêr

Noun

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blower (plural blower-blower, first-person possessive blowerku, second-person possessive blowermu, third-person possessive blowernya)

  1. blower: a ducted fan, usually part of a heating, ventilation, and/or air conditioning system.

Further reading

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Middle English

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Noun

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blower

  1. Alternative form of blowere