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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has articles on:
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French chanter, from Latin cantō, cantāre (to sing).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /tʃɑːnt/, /tʃænt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /tʃænt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɑːnt

VerbEdit

chant (third-person singular simple present chants, present participle chanting, simple past and past participle chanted)

  1. To sing, especially without instruments, and as applied to monophonic and pre-modern music.
    • Spenser
      The cheerful birds [] do chant sweet music.
  2. To sing or intone sacred text.
  3. To utter or repeat in a strongly rhythmical manner, especially as a group.
    The football fans chanted insults at the referee.
    • 2009, Leo J. Daugherty III, The Marine Corps and the State Department, p 116 [1]
      On their way to Parliament Square, the demonstrators chanted slogans, sang the Hungarian national anthem, and waved banners and Hungarian flags (minus the hated Communist emblem).
  4. (transitive, archaic) To sell horses fraudulently, exaggerating their merits.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

chant (plural chants)

  1. Type of singing done generally without instruments and harmony.
  2. (music) A short and simple melody, divided into two parts by double bars, to which unmetrical psalms, etc., are sung or recited. It is the most ancient form of choral music.
  3. Twang; manner of speaking; a canting tone.
    • Macaulay
      His strange face, his strange chant.
  4. A repetitive song, typically an incantation or part of a ritual.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chant, from Latin cantus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chant m (plural chants)

  1. song
  2. The discipline of singing

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French chant.

NounEdit

chant m (plural chants or chants)

  1. song
    • 1552, François Rabelais, Le Tiers Livre:
      chant de Cycne est praesaige certain de sa mort prochaine
      the song of the swan is a certain prediction of its death

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French chant.

NounEdit

chant m (plural chants)

  1. (Jersey) song

SynonymsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cantus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chant m (oblique plural chanz or chantz, nominative singular chanz or chantz, nominative plural chant)

  1. song
    • circa 1150, Thomas d'Angleterre, Le Roman de Tristan, page 104 (of the Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, line 1027:
      car sun chant signefie mort
      for his song signifies death

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit


RomanschEdit

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

chant

  1. Aspirate mutation of cant.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cant gant nghant chant
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.