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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian canto (song). Doublet of chant.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canto (plural cantos)

  1. One of the chief divisions of a long poem; a book.
  2. (music) The treble or leading melody.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of cantar

GalicianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese canto, from Latin cantus.

NounEdit

canto m (uncountable)

  1. singing
  2. hymn, song

VerbEdit

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cantar

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese canto (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria); from a pre-Roman substrate of Iberia and having a probable Celtic origin.[1]

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. middle or small sized stone
    • 1370, R. Lorenzo (ed.), Crónica troiana. A Coruña: Fundación Barrié, page 605:
      [Et] poserõ perlos muros beesteyros et arque[yro]s muytos et outros, pera deytar quantos et paos agudos metudos en ferros, en guisa que os que se quisesem chegar ao muro nõ podesem escapar de morte
      And they arranged many crossbowmen and bowmen on the walls, to throw stones and sharp sticks inserted in irons, so as the ones who wanted to came near the wall could not escape the death
    Synonym: callao
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Documented already in Latin as canthus (metal tire), voice that was interpreted as Hispanic or African by Quintilian; in that case, from a hypothetical Proto-Celtic *kanto- (confer Welsh cant (rim)).[2] Otherwise Latin canthus could perhaps come from Ancient Greek κανθός (kanthós, corner of the eye).[3]

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. rim of a round object
    Synonym: bordo
  2. extreme of a place
  3. corner
    Synonym: recanto
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • canto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • canto” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • canto” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • canto” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • canto” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Corominas, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997), “canto II”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico, Madrid: Gredos
  2. ^ Corominas, Joan; Pascual, José A. (1991–1997), “canto I”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico, Madrid: Gredos
  3. ^ cf. Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 635

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

canto (plural cantos)

  1. song

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cantus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

canto m (plural canti)

  1. song
  2. singing
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: bel canto

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin canthus, from Ancient Greek κανθός (kanthós), meaning corner, specifically the corner of the eye. Or from a Vulgar Latin *cantus, a word of Mediterranean origin akin to the aforementioned Greek term[1]

NounEdit

canto m (plural canti)

  1. corner
  2. side
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

canto

  1. first-person singular present indicative of cantare

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From canō (I sing) +‎ -tō (frequentative suffix).

VerbEdit

cantō (present infinitive cantāre, perfect active cantāvī, supine cantātum); first conjugation

  1. I sing (all senses)
  2. I enchant, or call forth by charms
Usage notesEdit

The sense of cantō essentially coincides with that of canō with the additional possible sense of the practice of charms or enchantments.

ConjugationEdit
   Conjugation of cantō (first conjugation)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cantō cantās cantat cantāmus cantātis cantant
imperfect cantābam cantābās cantābat cantābāmus cantābātis cantābant
future cantābō cantābis cantābit cantābimus cantābitis cantābunt
perfect cantāvī cantāvistī cantāvit cantāvimus cantāvistis cantāvērunt, cantāvēre
pluperfect cantāveram cantāverās cantāverat cantāverāmus cantāverātis cantāverant
future perfect cantāverō cantāveris cantāverit cantāverimus cantāveritis cantāverint
passive present cantor cantāris, cantāre cantātur cantāmur cantāminī cantantur
imperfect cantābar cantābāris, cantābāre cantābātur cantābāmur cantābāminī cantābantur
future cantābor cantāberis, cantābere cantābitur cantābimur cantābiminī cantābuntur
perfect cantātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect cantātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect cantātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cantem cantēs cantet cantēmus cantētis cantent
imperfect cantārem cantārēs cantāret cantārēmus cantārētis cantārent
perfect cantāverim cantāverīs cantāverit cantāverīmus cantāverītis cantāverint
pluperfect cantāvissem cantāvissēs cantāvisset cantāvissēmus cantāvissētis cantāvissent
passive present canter cantēris, cantēre cantētur cantēmur cantēminī cantentur
imperfect cantārer cantārēris, cantārēre cantārētur cantārēmur cantārēminī cantārentur
perfect cantātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect cantātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present cantā cantāte
future cantātō cantātō cantātōte cantantō
passive present cantāre cantāminī
future cantātor cantātor cantantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives cantāre cantāvisse cantātūrum esse cantārī cantātum esse cantātum īrī
participles cantāns cantātūrus cantātus cantandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
genitive dative accusative ablative accusative ablative
cantandī cantandō cantandum cantandō cantātum cantātū
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

ParticipleEdit

cantō

  1. dative/ablative masculine/neuter singular of cantus

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese canto, from Latin cantus (song; singing), perfect passive participle of canō (I sing), from Proto-Indo-European *kan- (to sing). Cognate of English chant

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. singing (the act of using the voice to produce musical sounds)
    Synonym: cantoria
  2. chant
  3. a bird’s song
    Synonym: canção
  4. (figuratively) any pleasant sound
  5. (poetry) canto
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin canthus or Vulgar Latin *cantus, from Ancient Greek κανθός (kanthós, corner of the eye).

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. corner (space in the angle between converging lines or surfaces)
    Synonyms: ângulo, esquina, quina
  2. a remote location
    Synonyms: recanto, retiro
  3. an undetermined or unknown location
  4. (sports) the corner of the goal line and touchline
  5. (architecture) type of stone used in the corners of a building
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

canto

  1. first-person singular (eu) present indicative of cantar

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkanto/, [ˈkãn̪t̪o]

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin cantus.

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. singing
  2. song
  3. chant

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin canthus (metal rim of a wheel), from Ancient Greek κανθός (kanthós), or from a Vulgar Latin cantus, of ultimately the same origin, or less likely Celtic origin, from Gaulish *cantos, from Proto-Celtic *cantos (corner), from Proto-Indo-European *kh₂ndʰ.

NounEdit

canto m (plural cantos)

  1. edge
  2. side
  3. (rare) thickness
  4. a piece of stone
  5. (anatomy) canthus
Derived termsEdit
edge; side
stone

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

VerbEdit

canto

  1. First-person singular (yo) present indicative form of cantar.

Further readingEdit