See also: COC, CoC, cóc, còc, cốc, and čoc

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Vulgar Latin root *cocō, from Latin coquō. Compare Daco-Romanian coace, coc.

VerbEdit

coc (third-person singular present indicative coatsi or coatse, past participle coaptã)

  1. I bake
  2. I ripen

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

coc m (plural cocs)

  1. coccus (bacteria)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English coke.

NounEdit

coc m (plural cocs)

  1. Clipping of carbó de coc.

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

coc

  1. first-person singular present indicative form of coure

Further readingEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *kukkaz (cock, rooster), probably of imitative origin. Cognate with Old Norse kokkr (cock).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coc m

  1. Alternative form of cocc
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Vulgar Latin cōcus from Latin coquus "cook" from coquere (to cook) from Proto-Indo-European *pekʷ- (to cook). Akin to Old Norse kokkr (cook), German Koch, Dutch kok (cook), Old English āfiġen (fried)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cōc m

  1. a cook
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin coccus (attested in the Salic Laws), from Frankish *kok, from Proto-Germanic *kukkaz, ultimately of imitative origin. More at cock.

NounEdit

coc m (oblique plural cos, nominative singular cos, nominative plural coc)

  1. cock (male chicken)

DescendantsEdit


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

coc

  1. first-person singular present indicative of coace
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of coace
  3. third-person plural present indicative of coace

Etymology 2Edit

Uncertain, perhaps an expressive creation based on a rounded shape, or alternatively French coque (shell). Cf. Greek κόκκος (kókkos), Latin coccum (berry), also Albanian kokë.

NounEdit

coc n (plural cocuri)

  1. type of feminine hairstyle with the hair tied and looped at the back; bun, chignon, loop
  2. (archaic) bun, bread roll

SynonymsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Probably of imitative (onomatopoetic) origin.

NounEdit

coc m (plural coci)

  1. (birds) night heron (Ardea nycticorax)

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from French coccus, German Kokke, New Latin coccus, from Ancient Greek κόκκος (kókkos).

NounEdit

coc m (plural coci)

  1. type of spherical bacteria; coccus