TranslingualEdit

SymbolEdit

cos

  1. (trigonometry) cosine.
  2. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Corsican.

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the name of the island Cos, whence it was introduced.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos (plural coses)

  1. A variety of lettuce with long, crisp leaves.
    Synonym: cos lettuce
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From 'cause, an aphetic form of because.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

cos

  1. (informal, UK, Ireland, South Africa, African-American Vernacular) because
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of cousin

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos (plural cosses)

  1. (informal, African-American Vernacular) A cousin, cuz.

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

cos

  1. plural of co

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *cōsō, from Latin consuō. Compare Romanian coase, cos.

VerbEdit

cos (third-person singular present indicative coasi/coase, past participle cusutã)

  1. I sew.

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin corpus, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱrep-. Compare Occitan còrs, French corps, Spanish cuerpo. Doublet of the borrowing corpus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos m (plural cossos)

  1. body (physical structure of a human or animal)
  2. body, corpse
    Synonym: cadàver

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


ChineseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Mandarin”

NounEdit

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) cosplay
    cos  ―  wán cos de rén  ―  someone who cosplays; cosplayer
  2. (ACG, informal) cosplay costume

VerbEdit

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) to cosplay

Derived termsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Slovene kòš, from Proto-Slavic *košь.

NounEdit

cos m (plural cos)

  1. basket
    Synonyms: gei, geùt, ceste

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine plural definite article os (the).

ContractionEdit

cos m pl (masculine co, feminine coa, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish cos, from Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-, whence also Latin coxa (hip).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos f (genitive singular coise, nominative plural cosa)

  1. foot
  2. leg

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cos chos gcos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 20

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *kōtis, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeh₃- (to sharpen). Cognate with Latin catus (clever, cunning), cautēs (pointed rock), cuneus (wedge) and Ancient Greek κῶνος (kônos, cone).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cōs f (genitive cōtis); third declension

  1. whetstone
DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōs cōtēs
Genitive cōtis cōtum
Dative cōtī cōtibus
Accusative cōtem cōtēs
Ablative cōte cōtibus
Vocative cōs cōtēs
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Catalan: cot
  • French: queux
  • Italian: cote, cotano
  • Romanian: cute
  • Sicilian: cuti
  • Spanish: codón

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

cos

  1. Abbreviation of consul.

ReferencesEdit

  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cos”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English coss, from Proto-West Germanic *koss, from Proto-Germanic *kussaz. Forms with /i/ and /u/ are influenced by kissen.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kɔs/, /kus/, /kis/

NounEdit

cos (plural cosses or cossen)

  1. a kiss (action of kissing)
    Synonym: kissynge

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

from Vulgar Latin caseus

NounEdit

cos

  1. cheese

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos m

  1. Alternative form of coss

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

cos m

  1. inflection of cop:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-. Cognate with Latin coxa (hip).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cos f

  1. foot
  2. leg

InflectionEdit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Vocative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Accusative coisN coisL cosaH, cossaH
Genitive coiseH cosL cosN
Dative coisL cosaib cosaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cos chos cos
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

 

ContractionEdit

cos m pl (feminine plural cas)

  1. (colloquial) Contraction of com os (with the (masculine plural)).

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

cos

  1. inflection of coase:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

cos m pl

  1. plural of co