Translingual edit

Symbol edit

cos

  1. (trigonometry) cosine.
  2. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Corsican.

English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Cos, name of the Greek island from where it was introduced.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos (plural coses)

  1. Romaine lettuce: a variety of lettuce with long, crisp leaves.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

cos

  1. (UK, Ireland, South Africa, African-American Vernacular) Informal spelling of 'cause (because).
    • 2021, Isabel Waidner, Sterling Karat Gold, Peninsula Press, page 161:
      Taking the shortcut through the alleyway by the Jobcentre Plus, just cos I can, we arrive at my flat within minutes.
Translations edit

Etymology 3 edit

Clipping of cousin.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos (plural cosses)

  1. (informal, African-American Vernacular) A cousin, cuz.

Etymology 4 edit

From co +‎ -s.

Noun edit

cos

  1. plural of co

Pronoun edit

cos

  1. (nonstandard) Belonging to co. Gender-neutral possessive adjective, grammatically equivalent to the gendered his and her and the singular their.
    • 1973, Michael Glenn, Richard Kunnes, Repression or Revolution?: Therapy in the United States Today, Harper Colophon Books, →ISBN, page 53:
      Psychiatrists are trained to try to impose the responsibility for a patient’s problem on the patient coself, rather than on cos environment.
    • 1975, Valida Davila, “A Child’s Sexual Bill of Rights”, in Bernhardt J. Hurwood, editor, The Whole Sex Catalogue, New York, N.Y.: Pinnacle Books, published 1976, →ISBN, page 287:
      WHEREAS a child’s sexuality is just as much a part of cos whole person from birth as the blood that flows in cos veins, making cos sexual rights inherent and inalienable []
    • 1986, Ingrid Komar, Living the Dream: Twin Oaks Community 1979-1982, Louisa, Va.: Twin Oaks Community, →OCLC, page 355:
      Co absents coself from the Community for more than three weeks beyond the point of having made satisfactory arrangements with the Community with regard to cos absence.
Alternative forms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Vulgar Latin *cōsō, from Latin consuō. Compare Romanian coase, cos.

Verb edit

cos first-singular present indicative (third-person singular present indicative coasi or coase, past participle cusutã)

  1. to sew

Related terms edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Catalan cors, from Latin corpus. Doublet of the borrowing corpus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos m (plural cossos)

  1. body (physical structure of a human or animal)
  2. body, corpse
    Synonym: cadàver

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • “cos” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Further reading edit

Chinese edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
Particularly: “Mandarin”

Noun edit

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) cosplay
    cos  ―  wán cos de rén  ―  someone who cosplays; cosplayer
  2. (ACG, informal) cosplay costume

Verb edit

cos

  1. (ACG, informal) to cosplay
  2. (slang, by extension) LARP; To pretend to be something, or act as something
    cos共產主義cos共产主义  ―  cos gòngchǎnzhǔyì  ―  LARP as a communist

Derived terms edit

Czech edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

cos

  1. Alternative form of cosi

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • cos in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • cos in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • cos in Internetová jazyková příručka

Friulian edit

Etymology edit

From Slovene kòš, from Proto-Slavic *košь.

Noun edit

cos m (plural cos)

  1. basket
    Synonyms: gei, geùt, ceste

Galician edit

Etymology edit

From contraction of preposition con (with) + masculine plural definite article os (the).

Contraction edit

cos m pl (masculine co, feminine coa, feminine plural coas)

  1. with the

Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish cos,[1] from Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-, whence also Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos f (genitive singular coise, nominative plural cosa)

  1. foot
  2. leg

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cos chos gcos
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “cos”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, page 20

Further reading edit

Kashubian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From co +‎ -s. Compare Polish coś and Silesian coś.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈt͡sɔs/
  • Syllabification: cos

Pronoun edit

cos

  1. indeterminate pronoun; something

Further reading edit

  • Stefan Ramułt (1893) “cos”, in Słownik języka pomorskiego czyli kaszubskiego[1] (in Kashubian), page 18
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “coś”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[2], volume 1, page 208
  • cos/cosz”, in Internetowi Słowôrz Kaszëbsczégò Jãzëka [Internet Dictionary of the Kashubian Language], Fundacja Kaszuby, 2022

Latin edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Italic *kōtis, from Proto-Indo-European *ḱeh₃- (to sharpen). Cognate with Latin catus (clever, cunning), cautēs (pointed rock), cuneus (wedge) and Ancient Greek κῶνος (kônos, cone).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cōs f (genitive cōtis); third declension

  1. whetstone
Declension edit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative cōs cōtēs
Genitive cōtis cōtum
Dative cōtī cōtibus
Accusative cōtem cōtēs
Ablative cōte cōtibus
Vocative cōs cōtēs
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Catalan: cot
  • French: queux
  • Italian: cote, cotano
  • Romanian: cute
  • Sicilian: cuti
  • Spanish: codón

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

cos

  1. Abbreviation of consul.

References edit

  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cos”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • cos”, in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898), Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • cos”, in William Smith, editor (1854, 1857), A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography, volume 1 & 2, London: Walton and Maberly

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English coss, from Proto-West Germanic *koss, from Proto-Germanic *kussaz. Forms with /i/, /u/ and /ɛ/ are influenced by Old English cyssan.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /kɔs/, /kus/, /kis/, /kɛs/

Noun edit

cos (plural cosses or cossen)

  1. a kiss (action of kissing)
    Synonym: kissynge

Descendants edit

References edit

Old Cornish edit

Etymology edit

Proto-Brythonic *kọs, from Latin cāseus.

Noun edit

cos

  1. cheese

Descendants edit

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos m

  1. Alternative form of coss

Old French edit

Noun edit

cos m

  1. inflection of cop:
    1. oblique plural
    2. nominative singular

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *koxsā (cf. Welsh coes), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *koḱs-. Cognate with Latin coxa (hip).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

cos f

  1. foot
  2. leg

Inflection edit

Feminine ā-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Vocative cosL coisL cosaH, cossaH
Accusative coisN coisL cosaH, cossaH
Genitive coiseH cosL cosN
Dative coisL cosaib cosaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants edit

Mutation edit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cos chos cos
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

Portuguese edit

Pronunciation edit

 

Contraction edit

cos m pl (feminine plural cas)

  1. (colloquial) Contraction of com os (with the (masculine plural)).

Romanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

cos

  1. inflection of coase:
    1. first-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. third-person plural present indicative

Spanish edit

Noun edit

cos m pl

  1. plural of co