Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin cutis ‎(living skin)

NounEdit

cutis ‎(plural cutes or cutises)

  1. (anatomy) The true skin or dermis, underlying the epidermis.
    • 1883: Alfred Swaine Taylor, Thomas Stevenson, The principles and practice of medical jurisprudence
      The cutis measures in thickness from a quarter of a line to a line and a half (a line is one-twelfth of an inch).

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LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *kuH-t-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- ‎(to cover). Cognates include Welsh cwd ‎(scrotum), Lithuanian kutỹs ‎(purse) and Old English hȳd (English hide). Related to obscūrus ‎(dark, obscure) and culus ‎(ass).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

cutis f ‎(genitive cutis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) living skin
  2. rind, surface
  3. hide, leather

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cutis cutēs
genitive cutis cutium
dative cutī cutibus
accusative cutem cutēs
ablative cute cutibus
vocative cutis cutēs

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin cutis.

NounEdit

cutis m ‎(plural cutis)

  1. skin (especially that of the face).

SynonymsEdit

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AnagramsEdit

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