LigurianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -āre, present active infinitive of (1st conjugation verbal suffix).

SuffixEdit

  1. Used, with a stem, to form the infinitive of most regular verbs.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin -āta, feminine singular of -ātus (1st conjugation past participle suffix).

SuffixEdit

 f (plural )

  1. Used to form feminine verbal nouns expressing an instance of the action expressed by the verb.
    aruxentâ (to rinse) + ‎ → ‎aruxentâ (rinsing, noun)
  2. Used to form words, derived from nouns, meaning a period of time.
    giórno (daytime) + ‎ → ‎giornâ (day, the space of a day)
  3. Used to form words, derived from nouns, corresponding to -ful (as much as something will hold)
    forçìnn-a (fork) + ‎ → ‎forçinâ (forkful)
  4. Used to form words, derived from nouns, meaning a blow with the named object.
    cotéllo (knife) + ‎ → ‎cotelâ (stab, noun)
  5. Used to form collective nouns.
    fórno (oven) + ‎ → ‎fornâ (batch (of baked goods))
Usage notesEdit
  • Meanings can sometimes overlap, such as in forçinâ (forkful”, but also “a stab with a fork).
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

SuffixEdit

 m (plural )

  1. Used to form a masculine agent noun indicating a person who makes or sells a specified article
    carêga (chair) + ‎ → ‎caregâ (chairmaker)
Derived termsEdit