See also: daïs

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
A throne on a dais (sense 1)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English deis, from Anglo-Norman deis, from Old French deis, dois (modern French dais), from Latin discum, accusative singular of discus(discus, disc, quoit; dish) (Late Latin discum(table)), from Ancient Greek δίσκος(dískos, discus, disc; tray), from δικεῖν(dikeîn, to cast, to throw; to strike). Cognate with Italian desco, Occitan des.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dais ‎(plural daises)

  1. A raised platform in a room for a high table, a seat of honour, a throne, or other dignified occupancy; a similar platform supporting a lectern, pulpit, etc., which may be used to speak from. [from c. 1800.]
    • 1922, Sinclair Lewis, chapter 14, in Babbitt, New York, N.Y.: Harcourt, Brace and Company, OCLC 1024921, page 177:
      Babbitt's party politely edged through them and into the whitewashed room, at the front of which was a dais with a red-plush throne and a pine altar painted watery blue, as used nightly by the Grand Masters and Supreme Potentates of innumerable lodges.
  2. (historical, northern Britain) A bench, a settle, a pew.
  3. (obsolete) An elevated table in a hall at which important people were seated; a high table. [13th–17th c.]

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DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dē(n)sus. Compare Italian denso, Romanian des.

AdjectiveEdit

dais m (feminine daisa)

  1. dense
  2. thick

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

dais

  1. Informal second-person plural (vosotros, vosotras) present indicative form of dar.