See also: Dea, DEA, dèa, dea-, deá-, de-a, de'a, and deʼa

BasqueEdit

NounEdit

dea

  1. absolutive singular of de

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dea f (plural dees)

  1. goddess
    Synonym: deessa

HypernymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

  • Dea (Goddess)

Related termsEdit

  • Dea (Goddess)
  • déu (god)

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

dea

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of dar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of dar

Hawaiian CreoleEdit

AdverbEdit

dea

  1. there, that place
    Da ting is ova dea.
    The thing is over there.

InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

dea (plural deas)

  1. goddess
    Britannia esseva un dea minor in polytheismo romano-britannic; su depiction actual ha essite modificate pro evocar le nationalismo britannic moderne.[1]
    Britannia was a minor goddess in Romano-British polytheism; her present appearance has been modified in order to evoke modern British nationalism.

IstriotEdit

NounEdit

dea f

  1. female equivalent of deo; goddess
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods,

ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛ.a/, (traditional) */ˈdɛ.a/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɛa
  • Hyphenation: dè‧a

NounEdit

dea f (plural dee, masculine dio)

  1. goddess
    Synonym: (poetic) diva
  2. (informal, acting) female star
    Synonym: diva

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdɛ.a/, /ˈde.a/[1]
  • Rhymes: -ɛa, -ea
  • Hyphenation: dè‧a, dé‧a

VerbEdit

dea

  1. (obsolete) third-person singular present subjunctive of dovere

Etymology 3Edit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dea

  1. (archaic) third-person singular present subjunctive of dare

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 dea in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Latin deiva, from Proto-Italic *deiwā.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dea f (genitive deae); first declension (for the masculine form, see deus)

  1. goddess

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun (dative/ablative plural in -ābus).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dea deae
Genitive deae deārum
Dative deae deābus
Accusative deam deās
Ablative deā deābus
Vocative dea deae

DescendantsEdit

  • Spanish: dea

Further readingEdit


Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dea

  1. genitive plural of día (god)

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
dea dea
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndea
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dea

  1. third-person singular/plural present subjunctive of da

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dea.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dea f (plural deas)

  1. (poetic) goddess
    Synonym: diosa

Further readingEdit


TabaruEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dea

  1. father
    'o 'esa de 'o deamother and father

ReferencesEdit

  • Edward A. Kotynski (1988), “Tabaru phonology and morphology”, in Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session, volume 32, Summer Institute of Linguistics

Transylvanian SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately comes from Proto-Germanic þu.

PronounEdit

dea

  1. You

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian dād, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

dea

  1. dead

InflectionEdit

Inflection of dea
uninflected dea
inflected deade
comparative deader
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial dea deader it deadst
it deadste
indefinite c. sing. deade deadere deadste
n. sing. dea deader deadste
plural deade deadere deadste
definite deade deadere deadste
partitive deads deaders

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • dea (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011