AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dia (reanalyzed as a 1st declension noun), from Latin diēs (day).

NounEdit

día m (plural díes)

  1. day

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

NounEdit

día f (plural díes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of dia

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese dia, from Vulgar Latin *dia (reanalyzed as a 1st declension noun), from Latin diēs (day).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

día m (plural días)

  1. day (24 hours)
  2. period of light, when the sun is above the horizon

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


LadinoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

día m (Latin spelling)

  1. day

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Celtic *dīyos (compare Welsh dydd), from Proto-Indo-European *dyew-. Cognate with Latin diēs.

NounEdit

día (gender unknown)

  1. day
    Synonym:
InflectionEdit
Unknown gender irregular
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative día, die
Vocative
Accusative , dei
Genitive día, die
Dative , dei
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Celtic *dēwos (compare Welsh duw), from Proto-Indo-European *deywós (compare Sanskrit देव (devá), Latin deus, Old English Tīw (Germanic god of heroic glory)), from Proto-Indo-European *dyew- (to shine).

NounEdit

día m (genitive , nominative plural )

  1. god
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 162a3
      In tan labratar ind ḟilid a persin inna ṅdea, do·gniat primam ⁊ secundam in illis.
      When the poets speak in the person of the gods, they make a first and second [person] in them.
DeclensionEdit
Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative día díaL L
Vocative díaL deuH
Accusative díaN díaL deuH
Genitive L día díaN, dea
Dative díaL déib déib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Irish: dia
  • Manx: jee
  • Scottish Gaelic: dia

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
día día
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndía
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *dīa, from Latin diēs (day) (reanalyzed as a 1st declension noun), back-formed from the accusative diem (whose vowel was once long), from Proto-Italic *djēm, the accusative of *djous, from Proto-Indo-European *dyḗws (heaven, sky). Akin to Catalan and Portuguese dia, etc. Not etymologically related to English day, from Proto-Germanic *dagaz. Compare English dial.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

día m (plural días)

  1. day (any period of 24 hours)
  2. day (a period from midnight to the following midnight)
  3. day (rotational period of a planet)
  4. day (the part of a day period which one spends at work, school, etc.)
    Synonym: jornada
  5. day, daytime (the part of the day between sunrise and sunset)
    Antonym: noche

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit