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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • de (Northumbria)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dee (third-person singular simple present diz, present participle deein, simple past and past participle dyun)

  1. (Northumbria) To do.
    What are ye deein man!

ReferencesEdit

  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [1]
  • Todd's Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[2]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

NounEdit

dee (plural dees)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.
  2. Something shaped like the letter D, such as a dee lock.
    the pommel is furnished with dees.
  3. (colloquial) Police detective.
    the dees are about.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


AiwooEdit

AdverbEdit

dee

  1. (interrogative) when

ReferencesEdit


BambaraEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dee

  1. child

ReferencesEdit


ChairelEdit

NounEdit

dee

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • W. McCulloch, Account of the Valley of Munnipore and of the Hill tribes with a comparative vocabulary of the Munnipore and other languages (1859, Calcutta: Bengal Printing Company)

Dutch Low SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Dutch die.

PronounEdit

dee

  1. (relative) who, which, that

EstonianEdit

NounEdit

dee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dee

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of dee (Kotus type 18/maa, no gradation)
nominative dee deet
genitive deen deiden
deitten
partitive deetä deitä
illative deehen deihin
singular plural
nominative dee deet
accusative nom. dee deet
gen. deen
genitive deen deiden
deitten
partitive deetä deitä
inessive deessä deissä
elative deestä deistä
illative deehen deihin
adessive deellä deillä
ablative deeltä deiltä
allative deelle deille
essive deenä deinä
translative deeksi deiksi
instructive dein
abessive deettä deittä
comitative deineen

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

dee f

  1. plural of dea

LatinEdit

Low GermanEdit

MaquiritariEdit

NounEdit

dee

  1. tree
  2. wood

ReferencesEdit

  • Ed. Key, Mary Ritchie and Comrie, Bernard. The Intercontinental Dictionary Series, Carib (De'kwana).

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French de, from Latin datum.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /deː/, /diː/, /dɛi̯/

NounEdit

dee (plural dees)

  1. A die or dice (cube used in games and gambling)
  2. A game which utilises or employs dice.
  3. (rare) A piece or cube of diced food.
  4. (rare) Something of little value.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


ScotsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English dīġan (to die), from Proto-Germanic *dawjaną (to die). Compare English die, Danish , Norwegian Nynorsk døy, Norwegian Bokmål , Icelandic deyja, Swedish , Faroese doyggja.

VerbEdit

dee (third-person singular present dees, present participle deein, past dee'd, past participle dee'd)

  1. to die
    • 1852-1859, Lady John Scott (lyrics and music), “Annie Laurie”, in Scottish Songs[3]:
      Maxwelton braes are bonnie, / Where early fa's the dew, / And its there that Annie Laurie, / Gie'd me her promise true / Gie'd me her promise true, / Which ne'er forgot shall be, / And for bonnie Annie Laurie / I'd lay me doon and dee.
      Maxwelton hills are pretty, / Where early falls the dew, / And it's there that Annie Laurie, / Gave me her promise true / Gave me her promise true, / Which never forgot shall be, / And for pretty Annie Laurie / I'd lay myself down and die.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

dee (third-person singular present dees, present participle deein, past dee'd, past participle dee'd)

  1. Doric form of dae (to do)
    Fit ye deein?
    What are you doing?

TeopEdit

VerbEdit

dee

  1. to carry

ReferencesEdit


VõroEdit

NounEdit

dee (genitive [please provide], partitive [please provide])

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter D.

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.