EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of deodorant.

NounEdit

deo (countable and uncountable, plural deos)

  1. (informal, rare) deodorant
    • 2005, Drum: A Magazine of Africa for Africa, number 687-694, page 32:
      Some men complain their deos don't work after regular use. Your underarm area can build up immunity to the same product. Alternating two deos can give you total protection.
    • 2014, Damodar Mall, Supermarketwala: Secrets To Winning Consumer India:
      He brandishes a can of deodorant (deo) spray as he says this, grinning all the time. 'I started using this about two years ago. I didn't realise deos can be so useful in controlling sweating and keeping me feeling fresh. []
    • 2014, Julia Franck, West:
      'Maybe it's a teeny bit embarrassing, but seeing that we're good friends, Jabłonovska, don't you use any deo?' 'Any what?' 'Deo. Deodorant.' She pronounced the final T sharply and distinctly.

AnagramsEdit

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of deodorant.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdeː(j)oː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: deo
  • Rhymes: -eːoː

NounEdit

deo m (plural deo's, diminutive deootje n)

  1. deodorant

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

IdoEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English deityFrench déitéItalian deitàSpanish deidad.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deo (plural dei)

  1. God, a god, a deity

Derived termsEdit

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish dead (end).

NounEdit

deo

  1. Only used in go deo

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin deus.

NounEdit

deo m (plural dai, feminine dea)

  1. god
    • 1877, Antonio Ive, Canti popolari istriani: raccolti a Rovigno, volume 5, Ermanno Loescher, page 40:
      Ti me pari oûna dea infra li dai,
      You seem to me a goddess among the gods,

Related termsEdit

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deō

  1. dative/ablative singular of deus

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *þeu.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deo m

  1. servant

SardinianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ego, from Proto-Italic *egō, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

deo (first person singular, plural nos, possessive meu, dative mi, accusative me)

  1. I (first person pronoun)

Related termsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dělъ.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dêo/
  • Hyphenation: de‧o

NounEdit

dȅo m (Cyrillic spelling де̏о)

  1. (Bosnia, Serbia) part

DeclensionEdit

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Clipping of deodorant.

NounEdit

deo c

  1. (colloquial) deodorant
    Luktar min nya deo gott?
    Does my new deodorant smell good?
    Synonym: deodorant

Usage notesEdit

The plural forms are inconsistent. The suppletive form deodoranter may be used as well, similar to many other Swedish words ending on /ʊ/. Compare radio.

DeclensionEdit

Declension of deo 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative deo deon deos deosarna
Genitive deos deons deos deosarnas

ReferencesEdit