See also: deuré

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

deure

  1. plural of deur

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin dēbēre (owe) (probably through a Vulgar Latin root *debĕre). Compare Occitan deure, dever, French devoir, Spanish deber.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

deure m (plural deures)

  1. duty, obligation

Verb edit

deure (first-person singular present dec, first-person singular preterite deguí, past participle degut); root stress: (Central) /ɛ/; (Valencian) /e/; (Balearic) /ə/

  1. (transitive) to owe
  2. to have to (followed by an infinitive)
    Synonym: haver de
  3. it can be assumed, it can be inferred, to be possible (followed by an infinitive)

Usage notes edit

While deu INFINITIVE as have to INFINTIVE of obligation is the general historical usage, nowadays in most of Central Catalan deu INFINITIVE has only the meaning of INFINTIVE can be supposed. Compare:

  • Se'n va anar corrents, devia tenir pressaHe ran away, perhaps he was in a hurry
  • Se'n va anar corrents, havia de tenir pressaHe ran away, he had to be in a hurry

Conjugation edit

Further reading edit

Latin edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

deūre

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of deūrō

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe) (probably through a Vulgar Latin root *debĕre).

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Verb edit

deure

  1. to have to
  2. to owe

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

West Flemish edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch duere, variant of dōre, from Old Dutch duri, from Proto-Germanic *durz, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰwer- (doorway, door, gate).

Noun edit

deure f

  1. door