See also: Dever, déver, and devêr

LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish [Term?], from Latin debeo, debere.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dever (Latin spelling)

  1. to have to
  2. should
  3. must
    • 2020 January 29, Metin Delevi, “El 27 de Enero es el dia de memoria de las viktimas del Nazismo, del Olokosto…”, in Şalom[1]:
      Devemos de akodrar i azer akodrar de este kavzo, ke se finalizo kon 11 milyones de viktimas entre eyos 6 milyones de djudios, para luchar kontra el antisemitizmo i el rasizmo.
      We must remember and make others remember this event that ended with 11 million victims, among them 6 million Jews, to fight antisemitism and racism.

NounEdit

dever m (Latin spelling)

  1. duty
    • 2020 January 29, Metin Delevi, “El 27 de Enero es el dia de memoria de las viktimas del Nazismo, del Olokosto…”, in Şalom[2]:
      Ija de imigrantes djudios rusos ke aviyan sufriyido del aborresimyento i del antisemitizmo, se sintyo ke el aktivizmo sovre este sujeto era su dever.
      The daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants who had suffered from hatred and from antisemitism, she felt that activism on this subject was her duty.

Northern KurdishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dever f (Arabic spelling دەۊەر‎)

  1. place, spot
  2. region, area

ReferencesEdit

  • Chyet, Michael L. (2003), “dever”, in Kurdish–English Dictionary, with selected etymologies by Martin Schwartz, New Haven and London: Yale University Press

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

dever

  1. (Gascony, Provençal, Limousin, Vivaro-alpine) to have to
  2. to owe

ConjugationEdit

NounEdit

dever m (plural devers)

  1. duty, obligation
    Synonym: obligacion

Old PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe; I must).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dever

  1. must; to have to

DescendantsEdit

  • Fala: debel
  • Galician: deber
  • Portuguese: dever

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese dever, from Latin dēbēre, present active infinitive of dēbeō (I owe).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dever (first-person singular present indicative devo, past participle devido)

  1. should (indicates that an action is considered by the speaker to be obligatory)
  2. ought (indicates that the subject of the sentence has some obligation to execute the sentence predicate.)
  3. will likely (indicates that the subject of the sentence is likely to execute the sentence predicate.)
  4. owe (to be in debt.)

ConjugationEdit

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:dever.

DescendantsEdit

  • Makalero: deue (debt, to borrow)

NounEdit

dever m (plural deveres)

  1. duty (that which one is morally or legally obligated to do)

QuotationsEdit

For quotations using this term, see Citations:dever.


RomanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Turkish devir

NounEdit

dever n (uncountable)

  1. total sales
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Bulgarian девер (dever), from Proto-Slavic *dě̀verь

NounEdit

dever m (plural deveri)

  1. (regional) in the country, a boy who welcomes the guests and serves them dishes at traditional weddings and also leads the wedding processional; (through extension) a person accompanying the bride
    Synonym: vornicel
Alternative formsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *děverь, from Proto-Indo-European *dayh₂wḗr. Compare Russian деверь (deverʹ).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dêver/
  • Hyphenation: de‧ver

NounEdit

dȅver m (Cyrillic spelling де̏вер)

  1. brother-in-law (one's husband's brother)

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

dever (first-person singular present devo, first-person singular preterite deví, past participle devido)

  1. Obsolete spelling of deber

ConjugationEdit