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See also: dolôr

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman dolour, mainland Old French dolor (modern douleur), from Latin dolor (pain, grief).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdoʊlə(ɹ)/, /ˈdɒlə(ɹ)/

NounEdit

dolor (countable and uncountable, plural dolors)

  1. (literary) Sorrow, grief, misery or anguish.
  2. A unit of pain used to theoretically weigh people's outcomes.
    • 1986, Rosemarie Tong, Ethics in policy analysis, →ISBN:
      Supposedly, utilitarians are able to add and subtract hedons (units of pleasure) and dolors (units of pain) without any signs of cognitive or affective distress []

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • (unit of pain): util

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

NounEdit

dolor m (plural dolores)

  1. pain

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan dolor, from Latin dolor, dolōr (pain, sorrow), from Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁ōs, derived from the root *delh₁- (to split, divide).

NounEdit

dolor m or f (plural dolors)

  1. pain of a continuing nature, especially that of rheumatism
  2. sorrow or grief of a continuing nature

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


ChavacanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish dolor (pain).

NounEdit

dolor

  1. pain; ache

LadinoEdit

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *delh₁- (to hew, to split, verbal root).[1]

Synchronically, from doleō +‎ -or.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dolor m (genitive dolōris); third declension

  1. pain, ache, hurt
  2. anguish, grief, sorrow
  3. indignation, resentment, anger

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative dolor dolōrēs
Genitive dolōris dolōrum
Dative dolōrī dolōribus
Accusative dolōrem dolōrēs
Ablative dolōre dolōribus
Vocative dolor dolōrēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • dolor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • dolor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • dolor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • time will assuage his grief: dies dolorem mitigabit
    • to soothe grief: consolari dolorem alicuius
    • to feel pain: dolore affici
    • to be vexed about a thing: dolorem capere (percipere) ex aliqua re
    • to feel acute pain: doloribus premi, angi, ardere, cruciari, distineri et divelli
    • to cause a person pain: dolorem alicui facere, afferre, commovere
    • to cause any one very acute pain: acerbum dolorem alicui inurere
    • the pain is very severe: acer morsus doloris est (Tusc. 2. 22. 53)
    • to find relief in tears: dolorem in lacrimas effundere
    • to give way to grief: dolori indulgere
    • grief has struck deep into his soul: dolor infixus animo haeret (Phil. 2. 26)
    • to be wasted with grief; to die of grief: dolore confici, tabescere
    • the pain grows less: dolores remittunt, relaxant
    • to struggle against grief: dolori resistere
    • to render insensible to pain: callum obducere dolori (Tusc. 2. 15. 36)
    • I have become callous to all pain: animus meus ad dolorem obduruit (Fam. 2. 16. 1)
    • to banish grief: dolorem abicere, deponere, depellere
    • to free a person from his pain: dolorem alicui eripere (Att. 9. 6. 4)
    • to my sorrow: cum magno meo dolore
  • dolor in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  1. ^ Meier-Brugger, Indo-European Linguistics

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan dolor, from Latin dolor, dolōrem (pain, sorrow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dolor m or f (plural dolors)

  1. pain

Related termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

NounEdit

dolor m (oblique plural dolors, nominative singular dolors, nominative plural dolor)

  1. pain; suffering

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dolor, dolōrem.

NounEdit

dolor m or f

  1. pain

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish dolor, from Latin dolōrem, accusative of dolor (pain; grief), from Proto-Italic *dolōs, from Proto-Indo-European *dolh₁ōs, derived from the root *delh₁- (to split, divide).

NounEdit

dolor m (plural dolores)

  1. pain

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit