See also: prendré

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Catalan prendre, from Latin prēndere, from older prehendere, from prae- (before) + hendere (take, seize), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed-.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (Central) [ˈpɛn.dɾə], (proscribed spelling pronunciation) [ˈpɾɛn.dɾə]
  • IPA(key): (Balearic) [ˈpən.dɾə], (proscribed spelling pronunciation) [ˈpɾən.dɾə]
  • IPA(key): (Valencian) [ˈpen.dɾe], (proscribed spelling pronunciation) [ˈpɾen.dɾe]
  • (file)

Verb edit

prendre (first-person singular present prenc, first-person singular preterite prenguí, past participle pres); root stress: (Central) /ɛ/; (Valencian) /e/; (Balearic) /ə/

  1. to take

Conjugation edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Franco-Provençal edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin prēndere.

Verb edit

prendre (ORB)

  1. to take

Conjugation edit

  • Literary imperfect: prenim, preniés, preniet, preniams, preniaz, preníant

References edit

  • prendre in DicoFranPro: Dictionnaire Français/Francoprovençal – on dicofranpro.llm.umontreal.ca
  • prendre in Lo trèsor Arpitan – on arpitan.eu

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French prendre, from Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prēndere, alternative form of prehendere (to seize), present active infinitive of prehendō, from prae- (before) + *hendō (to take, seize) (not attested without prefix), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰed-.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

prendre

  1. (transitive) to take
    prends ma maintake my hand
  2. (transitive) to eat; to drink
    elle prend un caféshe is drinking a coffee
  3. (transitive) to get; to buy
    Je vais prendre le plat du jour.I'll get the dish of the day.
  4. (transitive) to rob; to deprive
    prendre quelque chose à quelqu’unto take something from someone
  5. (transitive) to make
    prendre une décisionto make a decision
    prendre des mesures draconiennesto take draconian measures
  6. (intransitive) to catch, to work, to start
    le feu ne prend pasthe fire won't start
    la sauce ne prend pasthe sauce isn't thickening
    ma mayonnaise ne prend pasmy mayonnaise isn't setting
    ça ne prend pas avec moithat won't wash with me
  7. (reflexive) to get (something) caught (in), to jam
    je me suis pris la main dans la porteI caught my hand in the door
    je me suis pris la porte dans la figurethe door hit me in the face
  8. (transitive with à)
    Qu’est-ce qui t’a pris ? Qu’est-ce qui t’est passé par la tête ?What were you thinking? What got into you? What came over you?
    Qu’est-ce qui lui a pris ? Quelle mouche l’a piqué ?What was he thinking? What got into him?
    bien lui en pritgood for him; it was a good choice (literally, “he took it well”)
    mal lui en prittoo bad for him; it was a bad choice (literally, “he took it badly”)
  9. (transitive, in various idiomatic expressions) to start having a negative feeling towards someone
    prendre en aversiontake an aversion (to)
    prendre en grippetake a dislike (to)
    prendre en dégoûtbecome disgusted (by)
  10. (followed by a partitive, in various idiomatic expressions) to gain
    prendre de la vitesseto gain speed
    prendre du galonto gain a promotion
    prendre de l’avanceto gain ground
    prendre du retardto fall behind schedule, to run late, to drop behind
    prendre de la hauteurto gain some perspective
    prendre du reculto take a step back
    prendre de la bouteilleto gain experience
    en prendre de la graineto take away a lesson
    prendre du poidsto gain weight
    prendre de la masseto build muscle
    prendre de la brioche, prendre du bide, prendre du ventreto get a paunch
    prendre du bouchonto fail
    prendre de l’élanto gain momentum
    prendre de l’âgeto get older
    prendre de la valeurto gain value
    prendre de l’importanceto become important
  11. (colloquial; impersonal) to take (a certain amount of time)
    Synonym: falloir
    Ça va me prendre au moins deux heures pour le mettre à jour.
    It's going to take me at least two hours to update it.
  12. (colloquial; impersonal; by extension) to take (a certain number or amount of)
    Synonym: falloir
    Pour finir dans deux heures, ça prend trois personnes.
    To finish in two hours, it'll take three people.
  13. (impersonal) to come over (to arise in and gain some control over one's thoughts and/or actions)
    il prend [quelque chose] à [quelqu’un][something] comes over [someone]
    Il lui prend une fantaisie de mettre le feu à la maison.
    A fancy comes over him to set fire to the house.
    • 2015, Zaz, Si jamais j'oublie:
      Et s’il me prend l’envie d’ m’en aller, enferme-moi et jette la clé.
      And if I feel like leaving, lock me up and throw away the key.

Conjugation edit

This verb is quite irregular, with the following patterns:

  • In the infinitive, in the singular forms of the present indicative, and in the future and the conditional, it is conjugated like rendre, perdre, etc. (sometimes called the regular -re verbs).
  • In the plural forms of the present indicative and imperative, in the imperfect indicative, in the present subjunctive, and in the present participle, it is conjugated like appeler or jeter, using the stem prenn- before mute 'e' and the stem pren- elsewhere.
  • In the past participle, and in the past historic and the imperfect subjunctive, its conjugation resembles that of mettre.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prēndō, prēndere, from prehendō.

Verb edit

prendre

  1. to take

Descendants edit

  • French: prendre

Norman edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old French prendre, prandre, from Latin prēndō, prēndere, an alternative form of prehendō, prehendere (lay hold of, seize, grasp, grab, snatch, take, catch).

Verb edit

prendre

  1. (Jersey) to take
    • 1903, Edgar MacCulloch, “Proverbs, Weather Sayings, etc.”, in Guernsey Folk Lore[1], pages 526, 528:
      Ch'est prendre de Pierre Chyvret pour dounaïr à Monsieur Careye.
      It is taking from Pierre Chyvret to give to Mr. Carey.

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Occitan prendre.

Verb edit

prendre (Provençal)

  1. (transitive) to take

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Old French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin prēndere, from older prehendere.

Pronunciation edit

  • (archaic) IPA(key): /ˈpɾendɾə/
  • (classical) IPA(key): /ˈpɾandɾə/

Verb edit

prendre

  1. to take

Conjugation edit

This verb conjugates as a third-group verb. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Occitan edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin prēndere, variant of prehendere, present active infinitive of prehendō. Gallo-Romance cognate with Old French prendre.

Verb edit

prendre

  1. to take

Descendants edit

References edit