See also: Deal

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: dēl, IPA(key): /diːl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːl

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English del, dele, from Old English dǣl (part, share, portion), from Proto-West Germanic *daili, from Proto-Germanic *dailiz (part, deal), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰail- (part, watershed).

Cognate with Scots dele (part, portion), West Frisian diel (part, share), Dutch deel (part, share, portion), German Teil (part, portion, section), Danish del (part), Swedish del ("part, portion, piece") Icelandic deila (division, contention), Gothic 𐌳𐌰𐌹𐌻𐍃 (dails, portion), Slovene del (part). Related to Old English dāl (portion). More at dole.

NounEdit

deal (plural deals)

  1. (obsolete) A division, a portion, a share, a part, a piece.
    Synonyms: allotment, apportionment, distribution
    We gave three deals of grain in tribute to the king.
  2. (often followed by of) An indefinite quantity or amount; a lot (now usually qualified by great or good).
    Synonyms: batch, flock, good deal, great deal, hatful, heap, load, lot, mass, mess, mickle, mint, muckle, peck, pile, plenty, pot, quite a little, raft, sight, slew, spate, stack, tidy sum, wad, whole lot, whole slew; see also Thesaurus:lot
    • 1814 July, [Jane Austen], chapter II, in Mansfield Park: [], volume I, London: [] T[homas] Egerton, [], OCLC 39810224, page 35:
      There is a vast deal of difference in memories, as well as in every thing else, and therefore you should make allowance for your cousin, and pity her deficiency.
    • 1851 November 14, Herman Melville, chapter 32, in Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, 1st American edition, New York, N.Y.: Harper & Brothers; London: Richard Bentley, OCLC 57395299:
      There is a deal of obscurity concerning the identity of the species thus multitudinously baptized.
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 3, in Well Tackled![1]:
      “They know our boats will stand up to their work,” said Willison, “and that counts for a good deal. A low estimate from us doesn't mean scamped work, but just that we want to keep the yard busy over a slack time.”
    • 2013 June 7, David Simpson, “Fantasy of navigation”, in The Guardian Weekly[2], volume 188, number 26, page 36:
      Like most human activities, ballooning has sponsored heroes and hucksters and a good deal in between. For every dedicated scientist patiently recording atmospheric pressure and wind speed while shivering at high altitudes, there is a carnival barker with a bevy of pretty girls willing to dangle from a basket or parachute down to earth.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English delen, from Old English dǣlan (to divide, part), from Proto-West Germanic *dailijan, from Proto-Germanic *dailijaną (to divide, part, deal), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰail- (part, watershed).

VerbEdit

deal (third-person singular simple present deals, present participle dealing, simple past and past participle dealt or (nonstandard) dealed)

  1. (transitive) To distribute among a number of recipients, to give out as one’s portion or share.
    Synonyms: apportion, divvy up, share, share out, portion out
    The fighting is over; now we deal out the spoils of victory.
    • a. 1740, Thomas Tickell, “An Epistle from a lady in England to a gentleman at Avignon”, in Charles Churchil, editor, The Poetical Works of Churchill, Parnell, and Tickell: With a Life of Each, published 1880, page 51:
      Rome deals out her blessings and her gold.
  2. (transitive) To administer or give out, as in small portions.
    Synonyms: administer, allot, deal out, dish out, dispense, distribute, dole out, hand out, lot, mete out, parcel out, shell out
  3. (transitive, intransitive) To distribute cards to the players in a game.
    I was dealt four aces.
    The cards were shuffled, and the croupier dealt.
  4. (transitive) deliver damage, a blow, strike or cut. To inflict.
    The boxer was dealt a blow to the head.
    • 2009, Jake Conner, Maverick, Strategy RPG: Core Rulebook, page 99
      This is a heavy-handed weapon attack that can be made with a two-handed weapon, that will deal damage equal to 4 times your size category
  5. (baseball) To pitch.
    Synonyms: pitch, throw
    The whole crowd waited for him to deal a real humdinger.
  6. (intransitive) To have dealings or business.
    • 1838, Boz [pseudonym; Charles Dickens], chapter 11, in Oliver Twist; or, The Parish Boy’s Progress. [], volume (please specify |volume=I, II, or III), London: Richard Bentley, [], OCLC 558204586:
      Mr. Brownlow contrived to state his case; observing that, in the surprise of the moment, he had run after the boy because he saw him running away; and expressing his hope that, if the magistrate should believe him, although not actually the thief, to be connected with thieves; he would deal as leniently with him as justice would allow.
  7. (intransitive) To conduct oneself, to behave.
  8. (obsolete, intransitive) To take action; to act.
    • 1470–1485 (date produced), Thomas Malory, “(please specify the chapter)”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book IV, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034:
      Wel said syr Uwayne go on your waye, and lete me dele.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
  9. (intransitive) To trade professionally (followed by in).
    Synonyms: sell, trade, bargain
    She deals in gold.
  10. (transitive) To sell, especially to sell illicit drugs.
    Synonym: sell
    This club takes a dim view of members who deal drugs.
  11. (intransitive) To be concerned with.
    • 1922 February, James Joyce, “[episode 14:]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483:
      Science, it cannot be too often repeated, deals with tangible phenomena.
  12. (intransitive) To handle, to manage, to cope.
    I can't deal with this.
    I don't think he wants to go. — Yeah, well, we're going anyway, and he can deal.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

deal (plural deals)

  1. (archaic in general sense) An act of dealing or sharing out.
  2. The distribution of cards to players; a player's turn for this.
    I didn’t have a good deal all evening.
    I believe it's your deal.
  3. A particular instance of trading (buying or selling; exchanging; bartering); a transaction.
    We need to finalise the deal with Henderson by midnight.
    recognizing the societal deal between capital and labor regarding retirement savings
    • 2014, Jamie Jackson, "Ángel di María says Manchester United were the ‘only club’ after Real", The Guardian, 26 August 2014:
      The deal, which overtakes the £50m paid to Liverpool by Chelsea for Fernando Torres in January 2011 as the highest paid by a British club, takes United’s summer spend to £130.7m, following the £27m spent on Luke Shaw, the £28m for Ander Herrera and £16m for Marcos Rojo.
  4. Specifically, a transaction offered which is financially beneficial; a bargain.
    • 2009, The Guardian, Virginia Wallis, 22 Jul 2009:
      You also have to look at the kind of mortgage deals available to you and whether you will be able to trade up to the kind of property you are looking for.
  5. An agreement between parties; an arrangement
    • 2009, Jennifer Steinhauer, New York Times, 20 Jul 2009:
      California lawmakers, their state broke and its credit rating shot, finally sealed the deal with the governor Monday night on a plan to close a $26 billion budget gap.
    He made a deal with the devil.
  6. (informal) A situation, occasion, or event.
    What's the deal here?
    Their new movie is the biggest deal of the year.
    I don't think that's such a big deal.
  7. (informal) A thing, an unspecified or unidentified object.
    The deal with four tines is called a pitchfork.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • French: deal
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English dele (plank), from Middle Low German dele, from Old Saxon thili, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *þiljǭ (plank, board); cognate with Old English þille. Doublet of thill.

NounEdit

deal (countable and uncountable, plural deals)

  1. (uncountable) Wood that is easy to saw (from conifers such as pine or fir).
    • 1722, Daniel Defoe, A Journal of the Plague Year, London: E. Nutt et al., p. 86,[4]
      Some Houses were [] entirely lock’d up, the Doors padlockt, the Windows and Doors having Deal Boards nail’d over them,
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[5]:
      A brisk fire burned in the grate, there were three comfortable chairs, and a deal table with a water carafe, a bucket of coals, and a few other amenities.
  2. (countable) A plank of softwood (fir or pine board).
  3. (countable, archaic) A wooden board or plank, usually between 12 or 14 feet in length, traded as a commodity in shipbuilding.
    • 1819, Charles Pope, Practical abridgement of the laws of customs and excise, 5th edition, page CCXLIII:
      It shall not be lawful for any person to land any timber, planks or board, deals, staves, tar, pitch, turpentine, rozin or other the commodities aforesaid, on any part of the present quays within the city of Bristol, from any vessel coming into the said port...
    • 1840, John Ramsey McCulloch, “Docks on the Thames (London)”, in A Dictionary Practical, Theoretical and Historical of Commerce and Commercial Navigation, Thomas Wardle, page 590:
      Swedish deals from ports in the Baltic
    • 2003, François Cardarelli, Encyclopaedia of Scientific Units, Weights, and Measures, page 52:
      1 deal (US) = 12 ft x 11 in. x 3/2 in. (E)
SynonymsEdit
  • (wood that is easy to saw, from conifers such as pine or fir):
  • (plank of softwood):
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

deal (not comparable)

  1. Made of deal.
    A plain deal table
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English deal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deal m (plural deals, diminutive dealtje n)

  1. (informal) deal, a transaction or arrangement
  2. (informal) a deal, a bargain (a favourable transaction)

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

English deal

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deal m (plural deals)

  1. a deal: a transaction
  2. a deal: an agreement

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

deal

  1. (Early Middle English) Alternative form of del

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a Slavic language, ultimately from Proto-Slavic *dolъ. Compare Serbo-Croatian dol.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deal n (plural dealuri)

  1. hill

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin deus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /deˈal/, [d̪eˈal]

AdjectiveEdit

deal (plural deales)

  1. (rare) Related to gods.

ReferencesEdit

deal”, in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014

Etymology 2Edit

Unadapted borrowing from English deal.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deal m (plural deales)

  1. (business) deal
Usage notesEdit

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.

Further readingEdit