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See also: Doot

Contents

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

doot

  1. (chiefly Scotland) doubt
    • 1902, Jack London, A Daughter of the Snows[1]:
      "Mair'd be a bother; an' I doot not ye'll mak' it all richt, lad."
  2. (chiefly Scotland) think
    • 1920, James C. Welsh, The Underworld[2]:
      Andrew knew that Geordie would not have had a smoke for a long time, and this was his way of leaving him with a pipeful of tobacco.
      "I think my pipe's on the mantelshelf," returned Geordie, "but I doot it's empty."
      Andrew took down the pipe, filled it generously []

NounEdit

doot

  1. (chiefly Scotland) doubt
    • 1917, John Hay Beith, All In It: K(1) Carries On[3]:
      No doot he'll try to pass himself off as an officer, for to get better quarters!"

AnagramsEdit


Bau BidayuhEdit

NounEdit

doot

  1. wild boar (Sus scrofa)

SynonymsEdit


German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German dôt, from Old Saxon dōd, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz. Compare Dutch dood, German tot, English dead, Danish død.

AdjectiveEdit

doot (comparative döder, superlative döödst)

  1. dead

DeclensionEdit


Middle DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch dōt, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

dôot

  1. dead
  2. lifeless
  3. invalid, void
InflectionEdit
Adjective
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative Indefinite dôot dôde dôot dôde
Definite dôde dôde
Accusative dôden dôde dôde dôde
Genitive dôots dôder dôots dôder
Dative dôden dôder dôden dôden
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Dutch dōth, from Proto-Germanic *dauþuz.

NounEdit

dôot m or f

  1. death
  2. death penalty
InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • doot (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • doot (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • doot (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929
  • doot (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929

PlautdietschEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German dôt, from Old Saxon dōd, from Proto-Germanic *daudaz.

AdjectiveEdit

doot

  1. dead, lifeless